Looking for answers to life's questions

Comment Oops

I have a hard time with certain blogs I visit. I also have difficulty with groups I belong to when it comes to discussing childhood activities.

I was never really a child. I sometimes think I was born old in a tiny body. Well, not so tiny, actually. Does 13 pounds qualify as an infant?

Dr. French often asks questions on his blog and I really want to answer. Especially since he has been so kind and encouraging of my continuing to write my drivel. Most of the time I click the like button and disappear. This time, I wrote a comment, copied it to a word document that I keep for unpublished comments and began to delete the comment from his post. I hit send instead. You can read the drivel I left here.

Another blog that makes it hard for me but I usually gush over even though I make no sense is Jennie’s. She’s the worlds BEST preschool teacher. Why on earth would I read that blog? I have no young children nor grandchildren. Jennie is no kid herself but her heart is so very young and pure. She shows me what could have been under different circumstances. Like when you get a teacher who cares with all her heart. Very often I weep at how far she goes to teach her preschoolers the most important things in life. I’m a little sad because I wasn’t even able to do that for my own children.

What do these two blogs have in common? Books and reading. The thing that keeps the blood coursing through my body. They are teachers who love books.

Books in the den

When I was filling out my advanced directive they asked when I would consider the quality of my life no longer viable and be ready for it to end. It’s when I can no longer read or listen to a book. If there are no books in heaven, I’m not going.

Books in the kitchen

I was supposed to go blind before I was 21. Fooled them. There were no audio books then and I wanted to read…anything and everything. Then science created contact lenses and saved a lot of vision for me. More time to read. Yay!

There are children in the good homes with no books who are not being read to by their parents. When it comes to gifts for the children in my life, books are the only thing I give unless it’s something I’ve made. So many children don’t have a Jennie to awaken in them a love of books, art and music. Dr. French tries to do that for his college age students. I’m not a fan of his genre but definitely of his love of reading, writing, kindness and honesty. So, I had to be honest.

Books saying goodbye… maybe.

Do you ever regret a comment you left or have second thoughts about leaving it?

From my heart to yours,

Marlene Herself

 

Comments on: "Comment Oops" (145)

  1. Marlene, I agree , they are both wonderful and I have also left comments that were less than perfect, but I think most people are pretty understanding)beth

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    • Thank you, Beth. I agree. Most everyone here has been exceptionally kind. I think of things to say and very often file those comments away to examine later. I appreciate the visit.

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  2. Marlene, I hope you don’t mind that I shared a link to your post on my Facebook page. It shows your love of books so much and is THEREFORE inspiring to the rest of us!!! Haha, I’ve regretted more that I’ve said aloud ;).

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    • I don’t mind, Luanne. Thank you so much. I say less than I write because I can stop a conversation in its tracks. Like the story about my mother being on the front lines when others were learning about the business of family life. My friends didn’t know where to go with that one. ;( Oh well. Too soon old, too late smart. 🙂

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  3. Marlene, you are far too hard on yourself!

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  4. I love books also. And thankfully so do all my children. And my grandchildren, but there are other things I have regrets over when it comes to my kids and their education, but there it is…what is done is done.

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    • Yes, it’s too late to do it over but I’m so glad someone out there is picking up the banner and marching forward to educate all ages. There are so many opportunities now that were not available so long ago. Thanks for stopping by, Linda. Have a glorious day.

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  5. I regret some comments that I’ve posted…then shrug my shoulders and go on. Most people are very understanding. As for books. I love them as well and wouldn’t want a life without them. IF there is a heaven (not sure if there is) they would have things we love. I mean otherwise what’s the point of heaven? You always leave very good comments, my friend. So, I wouldn’t worry about it. Big hugs!

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    • Thanks, Jackie. I always feel so odd because my life was so different than most. Everyone you ask has memories of something wonderful in their childhood and then there are us odd ducks. Jennie is a teacher I wish my children had had and Dr. French is one that can inspire the next generation to love books and writing. I really want to connect them with others. I just feel odd most of the time but maybe I’m not so odd. Maybe there are others that are making up for lost time. Hope you are doing well. Miss you.

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  6. Why delete a comment that is so honest and open Marlene? It was wonderful and something sincere and meaningful. Maybe cussing somebody out on a blog comment isn’t really necessary, but sharing a part of who you are and what something means to you…isn’t that one of the reasons most of us blog in the first place!

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    • I don’t cuss people out in person, much less a blog. But admitting my education is sorely lacking is hard. I don’t think it’s all that unusual but a little awkward to admit. It’s a little like falling in the lake with your hands and feet tied. You can figure out to roll on your back and float if you don’t drown first. 😉 Thanks for stopping by, Deb. You are so very kind.

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  7. Your bookcases look like my bookcases… I don’t know that I’ve ever regretted making and leaving a comment, but I have regretted the reaction that some have provoked, mainly because the reader has misunderstood my meaning or got hold of the wrong end of the stick. I’ve had entirely innocuous comments moderated out or deleted too, but none of it has been enough to stop me leaving them and trying to initiate conversation and discussion.

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    • You are a much braver soul than I. I want to say many things then just hold back. I will copy the thought and save it but most often not post it. I do the same in life. Keep quiet and cautious. Probably why I post so seldom. It’s a learned behavior but this time I was a bit braver. Maybe the glass of wine helped. 🙂 I have your post open as I write this. 😉 See you there.

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      • I don’t know if it’s bravery or just lack of caution. I do have an Edit button, and use it, but also try to say positive and encouraging things most of the time, on the basis of Do as you would be done by… I have had honest opinions savaged in my home space and wonder at those who feel it’s OK to do stuff like that. Do you think it’s the relative anonymity of the web that makes people lose their manners and their filters of what’s acceptable? You and I were not brought up to think that stuff is OK…

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      • I don’t feel anonymous when I leave a comment. I feel quite vulnerable so I’m as kind as I would be with you standing here. My mother had no filter and my sister is very much like that but still working on it. I would not allow one of my children to be rude and my comments will never be either. There is no purpose to that. I’m more likely to hold back than to say anything hurtful. I’ve been on that end but never here. Oddly, all that read my posts are kind and I intend to be as well. I can’t imagine anything on your blog that could incite a mean word. You are just a wonderful human and always so very helpful. Sending hugs and wishing you a gentle evening with some much needed rest for your weary bones.

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      • Hugs back, Marlene!

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  8. That was no ‘oops’ comment Marlene, that was a comment from the heart, sharing your experience openly and honestly. That is the type of comment I love to see on my blog – I write to share my experience and my creative process and I love when commenters share back their response to what they have read or seen – as you so often do. It is one of the reasons we do this thing called blogging isn’t it? You and my first born would get on like a house on fire. She has giant bookcases in every available space in her house. While she has read most of them, there are still many books she has yet to read. She has high hopes one day to find the time to get to them ,though she keeps adding to that category. She is a bit of a book hoarder, like I once was. 🙂 Now I collect art supplies and you guys collect books. There are worse things we could be doing – and after all we are fortunate enough to live in countries where we can have our foibles and our passions 🙂 Balance in all things ❤

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    • You always make me laugh, Pauline. I love you dropping by and lifting my spirit. I’m sure I’d get along with your daughters, both, because you raised them. But a book lover will always draw me in. I learn about people by the books they keep. I wonder sometimes what my collection would say about me? I would let go of every single thing I own before my books. But even there, I’m culling many out in preparation for my next stage of life. I’m thinking of being more gypsy like but the books will have to find a way to follow me. 😉 Can you see the boxes? ;))) Thank you for doing my heart good. Giant hugs.

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      • I SO want to be a gypsy – but I have a cat and a dog and a pile of art equipment that I would have to trail along behind me somehow …… More proof that our stuff just ties us down and holds us back!

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      • :))) Like my boxes of books. At least they don’t need to be fed but they don’t cuddle with me either. How can we be gypsy’s and still have our stuff? Now there is the question. 🙂

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  9. Hey Marlene – I loved your comment on Dr French’s post. I’m glad you did not delete it. It came from your heart. You are so right about the value of books and reading. We learn, we’re transported to places unknown and we experience things we can often only read about. Books open up the world for both young and old. Keep reading, and keep writing, my friend!

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    • Thank you so much, Missy. My books will go after I do. I love every subject out there. They have filled many of my gaps. And I will write as long as possible. Hope you are doing well. Miss seeing you my friend. Hugs.

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  10. That certainly wasn’t drivel! That was classic Marlene and I loved it. “If there are no books in heaven, I’m not going.” I’m with you! We’ll just hang at your house…that’s heaven to me. I’m impressed by how neat and organized our shelves are. Wonderful post and I loved seeing your childhood photos…so adorable! Enjoy the weekend! xo

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  11. I’m with the above, Marlene; not drivel at all, not even close. Boy, can I give you drivel! But as many said commenting honestly, from the heart has to be fine. In my book any comment is fine; that said I’ve only been trolled a few times and even there I leave the comment, thinking most of the people who read my corner of nonsense will form their own views on it. Keep commenting as you feel comfortable, that has to be the most important thing. As for education, I always think about my mum; she left school at 12 to nurse her dying father and two smaller brothers while her mother went out to work – this was 1938 – but her education was like yours, like mine, like so many from books, from life, from listening the radio and other people. She was smart witty and well read and if you told someone about her educational background they were astonished. I look at those fabulous bookcases and think of the bungalow I moved mum into when she was 80; it was basically a carpet and bookcases in three rooms. You sound like you are the same knowledge sponge she was; an absent formal education left her insatiable, probably its greatest gift to her. Sorry, I’ve wittered on, I may be well off piste but we all welcome seeing you in our comment boxes when you feel the urge. And es, I read Jennie and she is inspiring and like you it’s not for the presence of small readers around me, but for the joy of joys shared and in my case memories from many places; to find a book is to find a parallel universe and explore it. May that delight never fade.

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    • Your words warm my heart, Geoff! I read your book about your mother and I like to think we have a lot in common. Grit and determination being prime. I finished high school but I am a sponge for knowledge. That’s where all of you come in. I learn from everyone, even a preschool teacher. Dr. French pushes gently to keep writing and I’m doing my best. I’m not very creative, just the facts kind of writer. 😉 No flowery words or poetry here. I will never be done with reading and my children are asking for my memoirs as well. It’s been an interesting ride. 😉 Thanks for stopping by. I really appreciate it.

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      • I think scenes of a life memoir are so powerful. My children loved learning about their grandma via my little pieces. After all it’s just stories isn’t it? Keep pushing that ink up hill, you’ll find your own horizon.

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      • Thank you so much, Geoff. I love the vision of your phrase; “Keep pushing that ink up hill, you’ll find your own horizon.”

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    • Well said, Geoff!

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  12. Your comment was very moving to me Marlene. It is a testament to you that your love of books and reading overcame your early deprivation. You are a true reader and I salute you! This is is the only comment I have made down here in Peru because the wifi is so unreliable, so I hope you know how sincere my admiration of you is.

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    • You are nothing but sincere, Cindy. All the creatures that pose for you feel that and I so appreciate your visit. I would flood the world’s children with books if I could and read to them the way Jennie does with such inspiration. Enjoy Peru for me. I always wanted to see it for the spiritual vortexes that are there. I’m sure the people are exceptionally kind as well. I’ll be thinking of you.

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  13. You writings are great, who doesn’t like a good book? Books can take you into a world you normally can’t go. I appreciate your Comments on my drivel, makes me smile. you rock.

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    • Thank you very much. I know many people who don’t read…anything. I’ve had to self educate myself so my books are of very diverse categories. The do open new worlds for us. Thank you for stopping by. I appreciate it.

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  14. Marlene, thank you so much! I am moved and honored. I am at a loss for words, and that is not something that happens to me often.

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    • You said I should write so I did. 😉 You have continued to encourage this old woman of minimal education in ways no one else has to keep me going. Although I just can’t read horror, I know you are an excellent professor because you start with kindness and encouragement. Very few go there. You have kept me from giving up more times than you know. You make a difference. Thank you for all of it.

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      • Marlene, Charles was one of my first blog followers. I feel the same way that you do. I never had a Charles in high school or college, a teacher that made Shakespeare and the classics come alive. Quite frankly, I never had a teacher make any book come alive. And I went to a good private school. That is a travesty. Thank goodness the Charles’s of the world are there!

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      • I think you and Dr. French do equally essential work at both ends of the educational spectrum. I can’t read horror for the life of me but I like who he is and how he is so encouraging. You are the teacher I would have loved in the beginning. I had no art or music all the way through school but somehow, I found books. I still love to read children’s books. I wish my children had a Jennie in school too. They didn’t get a college education either. Life is funny that way for many of us but I firmly believe you can learn much from books and life. You can’t imagine how much you have moved me with how you inspire young minds. I went to a new school almost every year. 13 of them by the time I graduated high school.

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      • I have said to Dr. French many times that we do exactly the same thing, just at opposite ends. Isn’t it interesting to think that he is reading aloud Shakespeare and having deep discussions, while I am reading aloud Charlotte’s Web and having deep discussions? And the art and music piece is equally important. I dearly wish I’d had teachers who read aloud to us. I was not a good reader at all. I remember struggling through Dick and Jane. I learned recently that the Dr. Seuss books – I can read books – were introduced as an alternative to the Dick and Jane books in the late 50’s. Holy Moly! That rhyming text would have turned me into a reader. My climb to reading was a slow one. Life is funny, and perhaps my love of reading to children is all the more important because I never had it. As you said, you can learn from life. I am thrilled and humbled that I have moved you with how I teach and inspire children. Moving nearly every year is really hard. More than I can imagine. You are an inspiration to me!

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      • Oh, the discussions we could have if we were sitting around a table together! I always wanted to teach and had hoped and worked to go to college but it was not an option for me. My parents were certain that my vision limitations would prevent success there and they may have been right but I certainly would have liked to try. Reading has never been easy but absolutely necessary to my soul. It opens worlds. Keep doing the good work, Jennie.

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      • We would have the best time, Marlene. We’d talk the day (or night) away. The eyes are a precious thing. I’d rather loose my legs than my eyesight. Hubby has Macular Degeneration and gets a shot in his eye every month. As terrible as that sounds, his vision is fine. I often think how lucky people are with all the advances in medicine. Reading is a privilege and a treasure. It is necessary for my soul, too. I really think college is not necessary for many people. Too many high schoolers feel pressured to go to college, and that’s a shame. Best to you, Marlene!

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      • Marlene, you are very, very welcome.

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    • I feel exactly the same way, Charles.

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  15. Anytime someone takes the time to comment, they are giving something of themselves. I’m sure the Dr. French and Jennie were tickled pink to have your leave something of yourself behind that let them know how their work touched you.

    I miss reading to my children – that was the nicest stage of our lives – getting lost together in a good story.

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    • Oh, Susanne! I too miss reading to my children. Once they learned to read, I had them read to me for many years. They are both still voracious readers. The topics cover such a wide spectrum that I could never keep up with them now. I want more people to visit Dr. French and Jennie and see how they are changing the world with their open hearts and kindness. Thank you for stopping by and your kind words.

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  16. Ah! Someone who has as many books as my husband and I do! I don’t know what I’d do without books.

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    • These books are all mine. 😉 My last husband did not read. I should have known it wasn’t going to work but I tried for 24 years. He still wouldn’t read a book. ;( They are from every genre, A lot of nonfiction, a few classics and a lot of spiritual, quantum physics, neuroplasticity. I finally gifted my children’s books of which I had many. I’m glad to know you are a book lover as well. Thank you for the visit.

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  17. The Pennsylvania Dutch had the best sayings. Just like you! Really.

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  18. Marlene, I am humbled and honored. ‘Thank you’ seems like small words to say. You are among the few who ‘just say it’. I love what you say, honest and real. So your words are even more important and meaningful. Really.

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    • Thank you, Jennie for inspiring me so much. I want everyone to read your blog as well. I once had an intuitive reader tell me I was a “just give ’em the facts, ma’am” kind of writer. No frills here. 😉 Honest and very real but gentled down a bit. Thank you so much for stopping by and for all you do for the next generation. You give me hope for it. Hugs.

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      • You are most welcome, Marlene. Your intuitive reader was right, s/he just left out the heart part. I think you are just wonderful. And, I will keep reading aloud to children and giving to the next generation. That’s what I love to do, and I do it with passion. I’m glad it gives you hope! Many hugs to you, Marlene. ❤️

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  19. I also enjoyed your comment about your favorite books! I do sometimes regret a comment and often hesitate. But, I realized that I wasn’t commenting enough or expressing myself, so I just try to jump in:)

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    • Thanks for wading into the fray here, Becky. It’s been interesting to see how many are cautious about their comments. I have stopped conversations dead in their tracks so writing them gives me time to pause. I may write and keep them just so I know what I was thinking at the time but never post them. No matter what I say, I always make it a point to be kind. Most here are as well. I’m working on being braver. as you have.

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  20. patricia puckett said:

    I knew you liked books but certainly not to this degree! I again loved your blog! 😘Patti

    Sent from my iPad

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    • Ha Ha, Patti! I’m a book hoarder!! But truly, I’ve let so many go these last couple of years. Worry about the floors holding them all. I know I’ve given away hundreds of books and am racing to get as much read as possible while I can. Making up for lost time. Thanks for stopping by. Giant hugs, my friend

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  21. J & D > Oh yes, there are comments we’ve sent from which, on encountering them later, we’ve averted our eyes! Books are incredibly important to us, and understand your ‘advanced directive’ (living will, in our parlance) in that regard, but we don’t get enough time to read, and therefore we don’t post about books anything like as often as we would wish.

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    • Yes, I agree. I’ve had many a comment I wish I had not sent which is why I often write them and paste them to a word document to see if it holds up or if I want to let it lie. 🙂 The advanced directive is required once they diagnose you with a terminal illness. Who knew I’d still be here a year later? 🙂 I’m going to fool them again just like with the vision. 🙂 I don’t usually post about specific books either as they are so personal to each of us and I’m a very slow reader. Audible books are such a blessing for those of us that are visually impaired. Isn’t science wonderful? The weigh less too. 😉

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  22. J > Like you, our book-cases are spread around the house – so as to spread the load on the joists and foundations!

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    • Exactly, Jonathan! I live in a manufactured home where the floors are not exactly built for weight. My fabric is heavy as well but I’ve always believed every room should be a library. 🙂 Thanks for the visit.

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  23. My goodness–didn’t you just get the reading world fired up with your post?! I hope you are reassured that what you have to say, in your blog and in your comments, is hugely valued here!

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    • I absolutely have been assured, Kerry and I LOVE starting a conversation. 😉 I’m almost certain I’m not alone here so I thought maybe I should put it out there. I felt pretty safe with Dr. French to say what I thought but I do have a tendency to hold my thoughts to myself. I always appreciate the input. Writing for public consumption if really scary. I have to realize my friends and family read this as well so I don’t want to embarrass myself or them. 😉 Thanks for adding to this topic. Always glad to see you.

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  24. Not comments, necessarily because I can usually “think them out” and say what I mean. But in real life? With my social anxiety? Oh yeah. Probably once a day I shake my head at myself thinking I should have said or done something differently. When I’m teaching, I usually come into my own space and get fully enveloped in the process. But when I’m just out and about and in the world at large? All I can say is that it’s good I meditate because I’d be through the roof. lol. That said, I have been working for a long time at getting comfortable in my own skin. I’m also working on “well, that’s just what I said in that moment.” The moment is gone. That person has already made their judgment, good or bad. Nothing I can do about it except be me and go on with my life. I try to reckon that if the person is supposed to be in my life, and tolerates my quirkiness, then they won’t mind that I’ve missspoken or even just spoken. But if they do mind, then…probably best they move on. I’m working on this principle all the time. Getting there…little by little every day. 🙂 Good food for thought in this post.

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    • I understand the social anxiety thing, Cynthia. It took me years to understand that’s what it was. I have stopped entire conversations with one comment which is why I’m so cautious with them on paper. I have so few friends in my life with all the moving that I don’t want to say anything to lose a friend but being a bit quirky myself, I guess they just have to understand. Like you said, if they are meant to be in your life they will stay.

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  25. Reblogged this on K. DeMers Dowdall and commented:
    Marlene, I love this post, that is straight from the heart. To answer your question: Yes…I have regretted a number of comments for one reason or another (left out a word, a sudden realization that I missed the point of the blog, or it was overly gushing with compliments, even though it comes from my head and heart. I had to reblog. I do love your self expression! I can relate, I was never a child either.

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    • We will have to continue this very interesting conversation at some point, Karen. Those of us that are born old are an odd sort to be around but we know things others do not. I too have missed the point of the blog in a comment. Sighs deeply.;( Thank you again for the reblog.

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      • Marlene, yes…we should continue our conversation. We probably have much in common. You are a lovely, caring person, brave and strong. I am so fortunate to know you. Karen 🙂

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  26. Yes, you were a baby even if very fully grown. 😊 I do agree with both the bloggers you talk about. Dr Charles French is great even though I don’t read the genre – same as you.
    Like our Jennie I admire they both display a passionate approach to teaching and support their pupils.
    As to comments, even if they aren’t what we would love them to be … I feel the same, they nevertheless show we take part and are inspired.

    Miriam

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    • Thanks for the visit, Miriam and taking part in this conversation. 😉 I wanted to bring to light that so many children do not have access to wonderful books. It’s wonderful there are teachers like Jennie and Dr. French. I have been inspired by both. And I agree, it’s important that we take part in the conversations and leave comments as often as possible. It does leave one vulnerable but so does all writing.

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  27. House of Heart said:

    I can so relate Marlene, just when I want to express my self the right words fail me. I think it happens to most of us. I don’t worry about it though cause I figure they will get it and if they don’t no harm. 😊🤗

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    • Thank you so much for stopping by and joining the conversation. At my age, any words are lucky to find their way to me. 😉 So frustrating. As long as everyone plays nice, which everyone has and I always make that a point, things work out. I just needed to point out that many of us didn’t have books as children. I would like to find more ways than I have to change that. Jennie’s post shows how important it is and Dr. French works at the other end to entice young adults into the joys of books. I’ve learned so much by visiting their blogs.

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      • House of Heart said:

        You have a lovely blog. It would be great to have book donations to be distributed to kids that love to read. I always read to my Child , he loved it and I loved that special alone time when we connected so well , talking and laughing. It really gives a child the sense of being cared for and cherished. Thank you for your lovely post, and again , I must smile about the comment issue, it’s hard to say what we feel but you did a great job!

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      • I’m so glad you read to your child. You are correct, it does make them feel cherished. It was a bedtime ritual for mine. I would read to each child and then ask deeper questions about their day so they would spill all their troubles before going to sleep. When the got old enough to read, I let them read their stories to me. It is a very special time and I do miss it. Now, when my adult children are here for the night, they still come to sit with me for a few moments at the end of my bed to chat about what’s on their mind. Those bedtime rituals are so ingrained. Thank you for stopping by and your kind words.

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      • House of Heart said:

        You’re welcome, my pleasure.

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  28. I’m so glad you accidentally hit the send button, Marlene – just look at the wonderful conversations you have started!! 😄 When I read that comment I felt very much reminded of what my mum’s told me about her childhood. So shortly after the war her family simply hadn’t the money to buy her and her siblings books. She came to them rather later too when she was allowed to the library. And now she’s just as vivid a reader as you are, and her bookshelves look just the same. 😊 Mine too to be true. 😉
    I was lucky that I got to have my own books from an early age, it’s a love that will never leave me. I still remember how I felt the first time I read a book – that endless sense of wonder. I still feel the same with every book I open. 😊
    As to audio books – I love them just as much because they let me listen to their stories while being creative at the same time – it can’t get much better in my mind. 😉

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    • Sounds like your mother and I walked similar paths. My parents were lucky to feed us right after the war and my mother had been a reader as a child though I knew nothing about it until later. All of those struggles make us appreciate things even more. I am so delighted that this spur of the moment post created such a wonderful conversation. I love conversations like this. It’s better than feeling like I’m hanging out here alone. I’d bet I would love your mom and you as well if we were to meet.Thanks so much for the visit and I’ll be catching up soon. Hope you are doing well, Sarah.

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      • I truly think you and my mum walked similar paths and have lots of interest in common which might be why I felt instantly drawn to you back when we met here on WP. 😉 And it would be so lovely to meet in real life too, if it weren’t for that dang ocean in between! 😂
        Food was also little to be had back in my mum’s childhood, she always had to take care to get something before her brother and sisters took it all for themselves.Maybe that’s why she always wanted only one child, so that it hadn’t to experience the same.
        Have a wonderfilled and creative weekend, Marlene! ❤

        Liked by 2 people

      • That space can get smaller with some creative planning. My daughter is trying to lobby for me to travel a bit while I still can. Working on it. 😉

        Liked by 1 person

      • OOH! That sounds awesome and so exciting! And your daughter is sooo right!! Let me know if/when you come over to Berlin!! 😀

        Liked by 1 person

      • Will do. 😉

        Liked by 1 person

  29. You didn’t write drivel, it was a lovely comment. I always appreciate your comments on my blog.
    I agree about books, so important. Heaven is a library!
    I love all your shelves, we need more, my books are everywhere.
    As for regretting comments. I once left what I thought was a reasonable comment and was verbally attacked by the blogger for it. I stopped reading her blogs, but it does make me think more carefully before I write a comment.

    Liked by 3 people

    • I am sorry to hear someone could be unkind to you as I’ve never seen a comment from you that could be argumentative. I tend to “overshare” and feel awkward about it later. Other than that, my experience has been all positive here. Maybe because I feel a bit awkward in the world as it is. 😉 There are so many people that don’t read or have access to books and I really want to find a way to make that better. Thanks for stopping by, Cathy.

      Liked by 2 people

  30. Marlene, interesting thoughts on commenting! I do leave them on many blog posts, but only when I feel like I have something to contribute. Many blogs also don’t have a comment section, and a few make it difficult to “comment” where you have to sign in to even like. Not sure what that’s all about! The most important thing though is that the readers enjoy what’s published and don’t feel pressure to say something. A couple of bloggers I’ve followed for years got on my case about not supporting them by leaving more comments. It was a little strange since for one they had all these hoops to jump through to comment, and even most of the time it didn’t work to log on. Even just liking was impossible. Interestingly enough they followed me too, but rarely mad their presence known. So I did what I rarely do, I gave up on them.
    Books are my friends too and I could never live without any. I do have a hard time listening and focusing on audiobooks though.
    Your baby pictures are adorable, curls and all! Hugs from me to you! 🙂

    Liked by 3 people

    • I know what you mean about the difficulty, Sabing. If they are on WP.org rather than .com, it’s harder to exchange comments. I had no idea I’d start a whole conversation here but I’m happy to see everyone join in. I wanted people to visit these other blogs that are so wonderful as my main objective. Also to point out that there are so many people that have to feed and clothe children with nothing left for books. Libraries were most often not available in my many moves. I was talking to daughter this afternoon about finding a small town with no library and donating all my books to them later. I am so fortunate now to have access to so many. I was awake most of last night and played an audio book until I could finally sleep. Talk to you soon. Hugs.

      Liked by 2 people

  31. As long as it from my heart to an other’s I never do. Thank you for being such an inspiration Marlene 💛

    Liked by 2 people

  32. Your lovely bookcases remind me of my Dads’…I love the worlds the shelves hold…thank you for sharing your thoughts and love of books!

    Liked by 2 people

  33. Marlene, I love every comment you’ve ever left on my blog, and all the comments I come across on others as well. For the life of me, I can’t find your comment on Dr. French’s blog. The only comment I see from you is two short sentences about writing every day. Reading, and the ability to read are lifelong gifts. We loved our visits to the library, both public and at school and treasured the few books we had at home. After dad died, mom had very little money for such luxuries, but i remember her briefly joining a book club to get “ten free books” or some such, and I still have one of them: a collection by Pearl S. Buck called “Fairytales of the Orient.” I wish I could come visit you again for another run through Powells and the long chats we so enjoyed. xo

    Liked by 1 person

  34. I’m back! I finally located your comment, and I’m so glad to read it. I started a program at my son’s grade school called “Books at Home”. It started by donating money to get all of the second graders five books and a bookmark we made for the program. A teacher mentioned how sad it was to see some kinds get a Scholastic order while the others did not. As is often typical of stupid school and PTA bureaucracies, the president of the club said we couldn’t designate funds to that program and a member asked “why can’t they just use the library?” It was heartbreaking standing in front of a bunch of parents having to explain the importance of books at home at an early age, especially since the Home and School Club had the means to ensure it. Now you’ve got me riled up. Books! Love them, need them, cherish them, and share them. xo

    Liked by 1 person

  35. The best blogs are written with the intent to not only inform, but to prompt discussion….I’d say “mission accomplished”! All this just means you are passionate about reading and living…a good thing, I’d say!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you so much for your kind words, KC. It is always my intention to start a discussion when I blog. If not, I could just be writing in a journal. I love hearing from everyone and learn a little from each of you. You are right, I am passionate about both, reading and living. Writing is just the summerary. 🙂 Thanks for stopping by.

      Like

  36. I’ve just been to read your regretted comment and I thought it was wonderful – so poignant. And also it introduced me to a new blog I hadn’t encountered before, so ‘thank you’ for your inadvertent writing.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you so much for stopping by, Jan. I’m glad you found one of the blogs I love enjoyable. I have to be honest in my comments or not leave one. I’m also trying to expand my bubble of blogs I follow as there are so many wonderful writers and people out there.

      Like

  37. I went over to read your comment on Dr French’s blog Marlene and loved it..
    As for Jennie, isn’t she just the BEST ever teacher.. Oh I so wish my junior school had had a teacher like her..
    I remember my headmaster in who was also my main teacher, reading a chapter of the Borrowers on a certain day of the week.. I couldn’t wait for that day to arrive and listen to what happened next..
    My English teacher then in my next school saw my love of books, but I was at the start even at aged 11 not a very good reader or speller come to that, But through her encouragement I read more and so my spelling improved.. ( though I still make mistakes as the correction of spelling often casts her red lines beneath my words lol )

    I know we have discussed our love of books before and I have book shelves and book cases all over the house.. Books are precious items to be well cared for a cherished.. and woe betide I see anyone make dogs ears of the corner of a book to mark the page..

    I love how Jennie reads and on her latest even Sings!! to her class 🙂 I often tell her I wish she had been my teacher and encouraged me as she does her young students the love of the written word.. Reading out loud brings so much magic and imagination and helps creativity in young minds..

    Thank you Marlene for this excellent post… That was no Oooops of a comment…
    Love and HUGs my friend.. ❤

    Liked by 1 person

    • I think we were twins separated before birth, Sue. We have similar outlooks on so many things. I had just a couple of reasonably good teachers along the way but never remember being read to by anyone. Of course, my memory is full of holes due to trauma. Dr. French is catching kids on the last leg of that journey and I’d bet he makes his class very interesting as well. I know him to be very encouraging. Thank you for stopping by, Sue. Hoping all is well in your little corner of the world.

      Liked by 1 person

  38. Marlene, I can never imagine you saying anything hurtful. You have only ever been inspiring, empathic and caring to me. I sometimes comment too quickly on something like Twitter and have been accused of spreading what someone called ‘social pornography’ on facebook, because I clicked ‘share’ – no comments just shared a post that showed folks zonked out on drugs with young kids in the back of the car. This lady hammered me with abuse! That was the end of our friendship but it did make me think more about sharing things for the purposes of discussion. I think branding it spreading “social pornography ” was a little harsh though. On the flip side, I have found two new fun blogs to follow through reading your posts. Thanks Marlene, you are a treasured blogger friend. ( and a very healthy baby) – I thought mine were large at over 10 pound.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I would never think to attack someone so harshly. Kind of silly if you ask me. Sounds like that person has an issue rather than you. I’ve been fortunate. For the most part, keeping my opinion to myself unless directly asked. That kind of attack was uncalled for. I look for blogs that are in a positive frame of mind. There is enough negative without asking to be maligned.
      When you realize I was born at home with only a midwife, my size explains why my mother remembered NOTHING about my birth. 🙂 She was a 2 pound baby incubated in a shoe box in front of the oven. Her doctors told her she would never have children. HA! Just so you know, I’m trying to get to your posts. I’m away from home and without my regular computer and time to read many. It’s been an interesting couple of weeks. I’ll catch up soon. Don’t let the trolls get to you.

      Liked by 1 person

  39. Forgot to say that I loved books as a child too. I had collections from our young as 5 – only small ones that I would read over and over again. I almost know them word for word. Still love what a library can offer a person. Knowledge is empowering.

    Liked by 1 person

  40. gsnprog said:

    You got so many books!!!

    Liked by 1 person

  41. So much to say here, and I’ll try not to jabber too much. Your comment on the other blog post is beautiful, and I’m so glad it’s there for others, so that we know we are not alone. You may not be changing the lives of preschoolers, but you are changing the lives of adults with your blogosphere activity. Your genuine efforts to be your authentic self touch others deeply, and help us reevaluate whether we are heading down the path to being who we want to be.

    I grew up poor, and had a few books that had been given to us out of charity. I was very fortunate in that one of them was an extremely outdated schoolbook, from the 1940s or something…but it was filled with stories, poems, and brief English grammar education lessons. I too was a voracious reader, and the six books on my shelf simply weren’t enough through 2nd grade, 3rd grade on through 7th grade… In 3rd grade my school had a Bookmobile (Glide, OR) because there was no school library. We were allowed to check out no more than 5 books, and I would always get 5. I would read them all on the bus home that night, and I’d have to wait till the next month for more. In 4th grade I talked my dad into giving me an allowance of $2 a month because I found a flyer for Nancy Drew books on sale through the mail for $1.95. Thank goodness for those Nancy Drews! I would dig through my parent’s room in secret to find more books, and read some that were not appropriate, like Are You There God, It’s Me Alice, and a book on female orgasm. But I still read them multiple times because I had nothing else. My town got a small library when I was in middle school, and that was wonderful. My high school had a tiny library, also wonderful. Still I wanted more. When I was 15 I worked at a grocery store that sold paperbacks. If the books aren’t sold, the store would rip off the covers to return and get a refund from the publisher, and throw the books in the dumpster out back. On those days after work I would climb through the dumpster, looking for books to bring home.

    So I appreciate your story. To know I am not alone in my weird upbringing.

    As for being sorry for a comment, it happens all the time on facebook. When I post my own feelings, on my own page, I know that people will comment. I tend not to say anything forceful unless I believe it is very important, and then I am driven by an animal force to make it public because I want to influence anyone that I can influence. Like policies on women’s rights to choose what to do with their bodies, and social attitudes about transgender people, and my frustration with the blinders that religious people can wear while they’re trying to be good people. Things that are very emotional and very important. I’ll give a powerful rant (because I got lucky and have a knack sometimes for making my point through words), and post it….and then I live in fear for the next three days, wondering what people have said in response. I won’t open up facebook at all for days, because I have so much fear about the passions I may have evoked, and whether I accidentally left someone out of the discussion, or insulted someone. And I do make people angry sometimes, but mostly I get a lot of support. So eventually I cool down. I think that’s probably what happened for you too.

    Hugs and love my friend. ❤

    Like

  42. Marlene, I will have to check out those other blogs! I used to teach preschoolers before I was married and shortly after. But I stayed home with our two kids and ended up homeschooling them! Even though it was hard, we got through it. But looking back, their toddler and preschool years were my favorite ones. I thoroughly enjoyed teaching them to read with phonics! What fun.
    Thanks for sharing all your books. And I thought we had a lot…😉

    Liked by 1 person

    • You will LOVE Jennie if you taught preschool. She often makes me weep with how far she goes to instill a love of reading, art and music in her young students. I often wish I’d had the foresight to home school mine. My sister in law did that and when her children went into public schools, they skipped grades. Hope you are having a Happy Easter.

      Like

      • That’s great! You know, the main reason we homeschooled our kids is because we live so far from the towns around us with schools. We had been thinking about while they were little, but honestly, I didn’t really want to do it. But it ended up keeping us all closer emotionally which is still how we are now that they are young adults out on their own. So it was worth the work for sure!
        Hope you’re having a happy Easter as well. 😁❤😁

        Liked by 1 person

  43. Well now, you *do* have a whole lotta books there Marlene. I’m a bit surprised the floor is holding them all up 😀 Our story books as a child were the Children’s World Book Encyclopedia. They had coloured spines that lines up in small bookcase like a rainbow. Dad read a story to us before most bedtimes. Other than that, we didn’t have a lot of books around, encouraged instead to use the school library. My mother didn’t enjoy us having a lot of children stuff strewn around. Mostly, we were expected to play outside not inside. It was the 60’s, so most kids were out and about, only arriving home at an expected time for dinner. I used to buy way too many magazine’s before I had internet, tee-hee 😀

    Like

    • Yes, I’ve started to worry about the floors too so we carted 7 more boxes of books out this week. 😉 I’ll keep culling through. We had similar situations growing up. No books in the house as everything had to be moved multiple times by the military. Libraries were rarely available to us. Which is why I hoard books now. 🙂 We never played inside so we needed no toys. I don’t remember there being any toys for any of us. But that lets us be more creative since we had to entertain ourselves. My children had little in the way of toys but books were always on the gift list. When my daughter was in fourth grade, she asked for the complete collection of Shakespeare. She got it and read it. Strange children I have. Both read anytime they aren’t working. Have a great weekend and thanks for the visit. Hugs.

      Liked by 1 person

  44. Reblogged this on Art Expedition and commented:
    I know from reading comments that some of you already know my friend Marlene from over at „In Search Of It All“, so this is mainly for those, who haven’t had the pleasure yet to meet her here on WordPress.
    Marlene is really one of those bloggers whom I always look forward to to read because I never know what she might come up with next. 🙂
    It might be some lovely childhood memories – about which she writes just beautifully so that you feel like you’ve been there as well – or about one of her many creative projects, of which the art of quilting takes a big part.
    And then there’s the thing we both love tremendously – books.
    In this post I’m going to reblog and share with you, she writes about two of the blogs she follows, (and which I also follow 😉 ), naming Dr. French and Jennie, and about leaving a comment on the former’s blog (she embedded a link in her post and I urge you to follow it and read it) that she didn’t intend to publish but accidentally did.
    Which turned out to be one of the best mistakes she could have made, because it started a wonderful conversation on her blog as well as on the others!
    It’s an honest and beautiful comment and exactly what blogging should be all about.
    And if you’re anything like me, you’re going to love her photos of her overflowing bookshelves! 🙂
    Enjoy!

    Liked by 2 people

    • Thank you so much for your kind words, Sarah. I do appreciate the reblog as it will possibly acquainting others with Dr. French and Jennie. They both deserve all the views they get and others will be as enlightened by them as I have been. Thank you again.

      Liked by 1 person

      • You’re very welcome, Marlene! And I hope that this will also get you all the views you deserve too. 😉 There are many conversations waiting to be had for you out there. 😄 Have a fabulous weekend, my friend! Hugs!

        Liked by 2 people

  45. I stopped by after visiting Sarah’s blog. What a beautiful post and tribute to the magic of reading. As George Martin said (paraphrased) “A reader lives a thousand lives. The person who doesn’t read lives only one.” Happy Reading!

    Liked by 3 people

  46. Thanks for sharing your thoughts, Marlene. Your love of books, reading and the need to share our love of them with children and young adults is a wonderful thing!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you very much for stopping by, Bette and hope you got a chance to visit the inspiring Jennie and Dr. French. The thing about books is that I want to read most of them. It doesn’t leave much time for the other things. Oh, well. I have my priorities.

      Liked by 1 person

  47. Hello Marlene, there is so much to love in this post. From your introduction to Charles’ and Jennie’s blogs, your passion for books and the Oops comment, not to mention all the wonderful comments and replies from you. I think I have read them all. Your kindness and passion for books shine bright here. I can see why Sarah, another amazing lady, had a crush for you. Anecdote: Like you I used to put Likes on blog posts but made very few comments because I felt my English was not good enough. And it took me forever to write a simple comment. Still does. But… “Nothing will work unless you do” – Maya Angelou. With that in mind, I made some efforts. Result? Through the last three years I’ve been blogging my English writing got better and the effort paid off. The friendship I’ve developed with some bloggers is amazing and priceless. My feeling tells me you have a similar story. Looking forward to reading more of you Marlene. -Dominique

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you for stopping by, Dominique and for your very kind words. Your English is better than my French or German. 🙂 I could not write a clear thought in any other language. I write like I speak, straight and honest. The blogging community is very kind, at least that is what I have found. They encourage and accepting. I’ve been by your blog and it’s very lovely. I’m no longer into fashion at my age but was many years ago. I wear what’s in my closet and buy nothing anymore. I started blogging because I had become so ill that I was pretty much house bound and spent so much time in bed and not able to watch television because rapid movement of anything caused extreme dizziness. I just can’t seem to give it up yet. I think it’s about perseverance in difficult times, Everyone faces something and we all need support and someone to share the good times. I appreciate so much all your likes and you taking part in the conversations I try to start. I love the conversations from everyone the most. Otherwise I would stop writing. Have a wonderful weekend, Dominique.

      Liked by 1 person

      • I am sorry to hear you were ill but thankfully you seem well now. At least, that is the perception I got from your photo in the lovely blue dress. Funny thing is just like you I wear what’s in my closet and buy practically nothing. I usually buy new accessories to stay up to date with the trends and I do lots of DIY projects. By the way, I am a sustainable fashion blogger but I am a nature, art and books lover as well. I think it is wonderful that you are so passionate about books. My hubby is a researcher and specialize in vision and brain so I know from facts that keeping your brain active with such hobby is good for you. Thank you so much for sharing with me. I enjoy our exchange. Have a wonderful week Marlene.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Your hubby and I could have some interesting conversations, Dominique. I have several books on Neuroplasticity of the brain and have always had limited vision. That’s why I like audio books so much. Sustainable fashion is an interesting subject. I’ll pop by more. Have a wonderfilled week as well, Dominique.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Ooh we can talk about neuroplasticity if you like. My hubby talks about this topic all the time. Because I am a scientific journalist he thinks I understand everything he says. Lol. Thankfully, he often forgets that he told me something and repeats the same story\information over and over. I admit I have never tried audio books but I am very tempted to give it a try. It would allow me to do other things at the same time. Thanks for your lovely comments on my blog. Much love!

        Liked by 1 person

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