Looking for answers to life's questions

A Way to Honor

I was not intending to write anything this morning. Then I remembered that I was planning on putting out my flag just at sunrise today. Sunrise comes late now; just after 7:00 a.m. so I had to hurry to get shoes on. As I walked to the end of my porch, I could see men getting ready to work on the lot across the street again. I put the flag into the holder and tightened it down just as the sun was rising. The view left me breathless and I felt humbled.

Sunrise 11/11/2019

My father and my children’s father both served in the Army. My father was in the Army for twenty years but I never knew exactly what he did. We didn’t talk about it or much of anything else. He was gone a lot, often for a year or more at a time. We were strangers to each other.

My children’s father served in the Signal Corps. He had to keep lots of secrets but I had a vague idea of what he did for a job in the military. Those three years changed him. Service to one’s country comes with a price. For some men and women, it’s the ultimate price, for others, the price is extracted for a lifetime.

I don’t celebrate Veterans Day or Memorial Day. I honor them in my heart. We don’t say have a Happy __ Day on these days. We take a pause to remember our servicemen and women and the price they paid. I wish you a thoughtful day.

From my heart to yours,

Marlene Herself

Comments on: "A Way to Honor" (53)

  1. I think you expressed what many of us feel very well.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. What a beautiful photo and a moving post. It’s a reminder that veterans serve their country, but so to do their families.Thank you for sharing this with us.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Beautiful photo and lovely words Marlene.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Well said Marlene!

    Liked by 2 people

  5. Such a lovely tribute, Marlene. Your photos is quite moving.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Your words are sincere and honest Marlene. A lovely post.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. I love your photo! And your words…spot on!

    Liked by 1 person

  8. I paused at the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month, and gave thanks. My great grandfather fought in the Boer War. My grandfather fought in WWI and my father in WWII. My brother and Husband were both in the reserves. All have lost friends. They gave their yesterdays for our tomorrows.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Thank you for your service Marlene and for that of your family. We honor you all today and everyday.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you so much, Cindy. It took a lot of adjusting when we left the military life behind. It’s like a large community. That kind of life made us stronger and more resilient.

      Like

  10. Thanks for this lovely and meaningful reminder, Marlene.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. We have just had our “remembrance” day yesterday. It is a good time to remember the sacrifices of all the family and the servicemen and women.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I wasn’t aware you had one on the same day!! I agree, it’s good to take the time to remember. Thanks for the visit. I’m so far behind and hadn’t planned to write anything. Just catch up with my reading soon.

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      • We actually have 2 days – one is probably more like your memorial day, in April each year – that’s called ANZAC day, but we also have Remembrance Day, which is a lesser celebration, which celebrates mainly the sacrifice of troops in World War 1.
        Don’t even think about being behind in posts. There is no obligation here on wordpress. Writing or reading can be instinctive.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Thanks so much for the information and the encouragement, Amanda. It’s getting to that time of year where there is more to do than energy allows so I’m having to pace myself. Thanks for the visit.

        Like

  12. I love the sentiment of this post, and the beautiful, moody photo.

    Liked by 1 person

  13. I agree, Marlene. Veterans Day is for remembering. I have several family members who were or are in the military. I owe them a debt of gratitude that’s hard to repay. 🙏🏻🇺🇸🙏🏻

    Liked by 1 person

  14. Well said, indeed, Marlene. I think, too, that it’s to remember and honor.

    Liked by 1 person

  15. You said it perfectly! Yes Honoring those who serve. I was born in an Army Hospital during the Korean War, Dad stationed in Seattle, joined before the Draft letter came. It was coming. My husband was also in the Signal Corp, three years also. Nearly was sent to Viet Nam, we waited on pins and needles- it was CO or NY. They chose NY, Grumpy stayed staeside, and then the war ended. My Dad retired Army Reserves and Grumpy served 8 years Reserves. Today I smile proudly, bursting with pride at all of our men and women serving- as if they were my own. We have so much to be Thankful for! Past and future!

    Like

    • Thanks for stopping by and adding to the conversation, Eliz. My husbands class was the first to not go to Vietnam and he started out in Thailand, ending up in Taiwan. He went right out of high school. Dad never finished school till the Army insisted. He did 2 tours at least in Korea and several in Germany. There is so much to be grateful for.

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  16. I love the heartfelt simplicity and directness of your Veterans Day reflection. And the accompanying photo is beautiful.

    Liked by 2 people

  17. A beautiful post, Marlene. The sunrise seems very fitting and meant to be. How wonderful to walk out to hang the flag and behold all that majesty. Yes, we honor those who serve and have served, we don’t celebrate Veterans Day. Thank you for sharing the service of members in your family. Best to you!

    Liked by 1 person

  18. I am not American, but do appreciate this holiday because I may not have been here without the Veterans.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Most of us wouldn’t have been there without their brave actions. Honor doesn’t care where you are from, it’s about how you feel. Thanks for the visit. You are always welcome.

      Liked by 2 people

  19. A very thoughtful post, Marlene. Your photo is truly stunning, I think I’d have got goosebumps in your place.

    Liked by 1 person

  20. Greetings. Just a comment on your Veterans post. My father also served in the Signal Corps and I now have his certificate of completion. He served in the French German Mignot line. the mid 1950-s.

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  21. Very thought-provoking, Marlene.

    Liked by 1 person

  22. Moving, Marlene. So many veterans are changed and wounded in ways we can’t see.
    Your early-morning description at the top of the piece is perfect.

    Liked by 1 person

  23. That was quite a moment on Veteran’s Day, Marlene. I’m glad it inspired you to write. I also appreciate, as others have stated, the simplicity of your post. You got to the point. Though it sounds like you have made peace with not knowing your father’s story, I hear some wistfulness there, I think. I wish you had been able to know his story somehow. Not that it would have answered all the questions, because he probably didn’t even know why he was changed, but I always prefer knowing to not knowing, so maybe it would have helped.

    Liked by 1 person

    • That is my style of writing, Crystal. Short and to the point. I’ve never been a wordy person unless I’m telling you a story. Often it’s hard to keep them short. Our dad and my children’s dad were emotionally unavailable. He let us in a little later in life and I found out we were reading the same spiritual books! Yes, some wistfulness but it is what it is.

      Liked by 1 person

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