Looking for answers to life's questions

Work

My second prompt was about work and I had a hard time with this one. Hence the late arrival.

Everyone needs work to do. It can build self esteem under optimal conditions. Which is why working at something you feel passionately about is essential. There are even animals that love to work. It’s built into us.

Growing up, we were instilled with an extra strong work ethic to the point that I found myself unable to be still unless I was reading a book which rarely was allowed. My parents always found work for us to do. Sitting and playing was never an option.

I’ll do the hard work

My dream of becoming a teacher never materialized. I hold teachers in the highest esteem. Without them, there would be no doctors, lawyers, or even actors and athletes. There are good teachers and then there are exceptional teachers. I was lucky enough to get at least one exceptional teacher. Her work changed my life.

Never afraid of hard work and I fit underneath better.

I am no longer in the work force but I’ve done so many different kinds of work in the different stages of my life. I’ve been an after school sitter and dinner maker, waitress, carhop, retail supervisor, hairdresser, secretary and switchboard operator for a security company where I had a phone at both ears. For a short time, I worked for Bell telephone in the IBM card reading department. I failed the eye test to work switchboard so they thought I’d do better reading tiny holes in cards. I wound up doing the job of two people working 12-hour days.  Each one of those jobs were about survival. I gave them all my very best efforts.

Mom and me, senior year of high school. Mom has the cigarette.

When my daughter was an infant, I went to a cocktail party with the husband for his work. One of his  coworkers was introduced to me and she asked what I did? I replied that I was raising two children and taking care of our home. She asked what else I did. Coming from another woman, I was stunned silent. That this is work that is not valued by other women made me question myself.

My favorite job in the world.

I learned about Color and Image consulting after the children were grown and gone. I studied for a year loving every minute. It was the first work I had ever done for myself. Now understand that I am not a fashion person. I found this method helped enhance individual personality in how you dressed and the colors you wore. It helped each person discover so much about themselves that had laid dormant.

I didn’t care about fancy dress. I cared about authenticity. Finding colors and styles that showed others who was really stepping in front of them was exciting. It couldn’t have been a job because I pretty much gave away most of my services for the pure delight of it. It was the second-best work I’ve ever done.

The best work I’ve ever had in my life was raising my children and giving them a voracious appetite for reading anything and everything. In our family, books are the gift of choice all the way around.

A most precious moment caught on film

Helping children read is my greatest passion and work in this world. Being brought up bilingual, I had a difficult time with words. For a short time when my dad was around, he taught me how to discern the spelling and meaning of words I did not know so that no one could speak above my level of understanding again. He did that with a GED earned while in the army.

What was some of your most interesting work through the years?

From my heart to yours,

Marlene Herself

Comments on: "Work" (63)

  1. Hi Marlene. Gosh, I just learned the most interesting things about you. One of the things that surprised me was that you are bilingual. It is no surprise to me that you have been a hard worker all of your life as you still continue on. You always have projects going! I too got my love of reading from my father who only had an eighth grade education and was one of the smartest self-taught people I ever knew. He also instilled the value and satisfaction of a job well done. I also spent many years as a stay-at-home mom-doing what I had to do to financially make it work (as husband #1 was not a great provider). I did not start my “career” until I was 46 years old. I ended up working in Social Services until I retired. It was the best job ever! I would almost pinch myself to think I was getting paid to do a job I loved so much-helping other people. Sadly the last 6 years were pure torture due to bureaucrats who thought they knew better. Now my favorite job is retirement, being a mom, wife, and grandma! For me, it just doesn’t get much better than that!

    Liked by 2 people

    • I’m learning more about you too, Jan. Working for Social Security is a good job. My niece has worked for them for many years. Bureaucrats can ruin anything as we all know so well. I love retirement and have never worked harder. My German is in need of serious help because after 60 years of little use, I’m lacking there. Just too many other things to do but I may just have to study more. Keep enjoying that family and your retirement.

      Liked by 2 people

  2. I love your ‘do’ in the one picture with your mom! (the one with the cigarette 😉 ) I knew you were always a hard worker. It still shows. As for me, well a lot like you really. I held various jobs throughout my life. My first jobs were around the house, like most kids. I did dishes, laundry, sweeping scrubbing. We all did! My first ‘paying’ job was at a warehouse. I put catalog orders together for JCPenny. Then, let’s see, I’ve worked on building mobile homes, a secretary, cashier at an antique mall (when they were popular), cashier in a casino, cashier in a convenience store, and administrative assistant. I might be missing one or two. lol I never had kids, so no work there. I do agree with you that everyone is happier with a job. If it’s something you love, all the better! ❤

    Liked by 4 people

    • My husband was more than resistant to me working. A career was out of the question. But I think an eclectic work history makes us more versatile in our conversations with people. I left out the factory job building high pressure sodium lights. Your working life is good fodder for writing. Nothing boring there. Keeping my word count low keeps a lot unsaid here. I always knew you were raised to work hard and had to your entire life. I’m ready to start my memoirs and this helps me bring up memories. The more we write, the more we can write. Keep at it. Hugs, M

      Liked by 2 people

      • Yeah, my first husband got me fired from a few jobs as he hated me working. No control over me then. You are right, my friend. Working different jobs gives us stories. Some good, some not so much. lol

        Liked by 1 person

  3. I was a journalist, then switched careers and became a counselor. Funny how both jobs used a lot of the same skills, especially the requirement to really listen to people.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Listening to people is an invaluable skill. One I’m always working to improve. I can see how it’s valuable in both careers. I would imagine you have heard some incredible stories. Thanks so much for stopping by, Debi. Happier New Year. 😉

      Liked by 2 people

  4. Love emanates. What a lovely family. Your daughter is a beauty

    Liked by 1 person

  5. sharynghathcock said:

    Greetings dearest Marlene,

    Your most interesting life continues to feed your love of writing. I still have my color photo book you so brilliantly complied. l recall that you encouraged me to let my hair go natural as it would better match my skin. Thank you as I have been silver for almost 18 years. Well, for a couple of years in-between, I “hit the dye bottle” yet, happily returned to my natural shade.

    At 72 years young, I am grateful to still BE Whom I Love. Even when we sold our movie theatres, in 2001 & my husband retired, I kept my Feng Shui Simplified Consultancy active. It has been my saving grace as serving others is a blessing. I now work via Zoom.

    With you as their Mother, Heather & Eric have an amazing mentor. You are a dear friend with a huge heart. I appreciated reading your well-written story. It told me so many of your rich experiences I would never have known. And, you didn’t even mention your remarkable quilting talents. To BE Continued…

    Liked by 2 people

    • Thank you for your kind words and joining the conversation, Sharyn. You are doing 72 much better than I. 🙂 We talk and use Feng Shui here all the time. It’s become part of us thanks to you. I do love your silver hair more than the colored hair. It softens your look and makes you more approachable. I started noticing how much that worked with my own mother. There is a lot left out when you try to keep a post to 500 words. This one was a bit long but I did leave some jobs out. It’s been an interesting turn of life, most certainly. Hugs to you.

      Like

  6. My favourite job of the past was copywriting, coming up with the text that appeared on toy packaging. I had to play with each one to find out what it could do, what the maker thought was the toy’s narrative, creating a universe for ranges of toys. It was a lot of fun, and came really easily to me.
    Love the updo – aren’t you glad we don’t have to create those towers of hair any more…?

    Liked by 2 people

    • What an interesting and exciting job you had! Wow! I’m a very simple person but going to hairdressers school at the same time as high school and then working, meant someone was always doing something to each other’s hair. My son said I was so white because I didn’t have time to see the sun that year. 🙂 Thanks for stopping by.

      Liked by 1 person

  7. Wow, Marlene! I love your work experiences. Let’s see. I worked a concession stand at a trap and skeet club; was a grill cook at a diner; worked on archeological digs; ran audio visual equipment; was a receptionist for a real estate firm; documented historical structures for an engineering firm; did editorial work; did total quality management and policy analysis; evaluated the effectiveness of various government programs; wrote articles; and currently help people design ways to evaluate the effectiveness of their projects and programs. And I also cook and garden and clean house and do laundry, some of which is very satisfying. I’m currently working myself up to painting the living room and the bedroom, but both require some patching and sanding first…work never ends, really. It’s good to know how many jobs are out there and here about some of the ones you did.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Thanks for joining the conversation, Lisa. You had a lot of variety as well. It makes life more interesting, doesn’t it. You are a master gardener, most certainly. As women, we do all the jobs. Then we wonder why we don’t have enough time to do it all. 😉 You have some impressive jobs on your list. And you are still working. I miss going to work and seeing people, making conversation and learning new perspectives. Very few get to do that right now. Good luck with the painting. Always a bigger job than it appears. 😉

      Liked by 1 person

  8. I love your post and the beautiful photos, Marlene!!! I was lucky to become a teacher, even though I was already in my mid-40s when I finally made it. Previous to that, I was also an Avon lady, sold Sarah Coventry jewelry, worked in a microfilm department at an insurance center, served as a daycare worker, and finally taught preschool, elementary, and middle school language arts. Like you, my favorite and most important work was raising my children. I was lucky to be able to stay home with them until I entered college after the divorce. I loved being a full-time mom, and my first daughter accompanied me as the youngest “Avon lady” ever:)

    Liked by 2 people

    • I love your story too, Becky!! I didn’t divorce the second time till I was 60 and too disabled to work or go for the dream. But all in all, I have had an interesting and eclectic life. I can just see you and your your daughter ringing the doorbell singing ‘Avon Ladies”. 😉 Teachers should be at the very top of the salary range. The better the teacher, the better the pay. You have my deepest and abiding respect. Thank you for that and joining the conversation.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. Hey Marlene-a-go-go ! You’ve got a nice well rounded resume. I’m sure you were always the hardest working one in any group. Your childhood sounded quite structured. I recognize that kind of structure. Although, we were aloud to play, it had to be quietly or suffer the wrath.
    Kids made to play quietly really don’t know how to play. When I got older, I could hang out at my friends house. Her mom was happy, playful, sporty and pretty. It was so different over there and I loved that.
    Anywho, I’ve had a few jobs since leaving a 24 year stint at a national communications company. There was a Garden Centre, Flower Shop and 3 different Scrapbook Store. My favourite was the first scrapbook store. The business owner and I are still good friends. It was a great team, 13 of us. We had so much fun and still get together for brunches and art classes. Once you have a job that’s enjoyable, all others that come after are naturally compared to it. So I haven’t found another job as good and I’m no longer looking. With Covid this year, there wasn’t any point to it. Stay well my friend xK

    Liked by 2 people

    • You get the gist of my childhood quite well. There was no going to a friends house for me though. That resume will get me bupkis on the job market. 😉 That’s ok, I’m to old to take a job anyway but I still work. I’ll probably go out with the shovel in my own hand. :))) Best to stay home right now if you can. They are flat crazy out there.

      Liked by 1 person

  10. I loved this post, Marlene. It was a pleasure learning more about you. When I think of past jobs, I can’t help but recall my favorite. As a teenager, I worked as a skate guard, patrolling the rink. Getting paid to rollerskate was the best job ever! I loved seeing all of your photographs. You look exactly the same in the picture with your mother…less hair of course. Happy New Year!❤️

    Liked by 2 people

    • Thanks for joining the conversation, Jill. Wow! Wouldn’t it be fun to get paid for a fun job now? My mother had more color in those days. I never had time to see sunlight. She was a banquet manager at a Holiday Inn restaurant and I was one of her lackeys. 🙂 Beauty school resulted in outrageous do’s most of the time. 🙂 Happy New Year to you as well. It has to get better.

      Liked by 1 person

  11. This was such an interesting post! I really enjoyed it. Thank you for sharing your family photos. They’re very special. (That was quite a bouffant hairdo you had in the waitress photo.) I worked as a counter girl at Woolworth’s lunch counter. The best I can say about that experience is that I got four short stories out of it. I got one short story out of my two years teaching high school English and Latin in rural Virginia.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you so much Liz for those kind words! Those were the Do days with big hair. Glad they are gone. I was always a simple, practical person but had to endure that foolishness. Teaching and anything to do with people will give you fodder for stories. I try to keep mine short here but I could fill pages and chapters. I can’t imagine Latin in rural Virginia. 😉 Love to read those stories. Did you give up teaching completely?

      Liked by 1 person

  12. You did a wonderful job Marlene 💕💝💕

    Liked by 1 person

  13. Your words are inspiring, Marlene. We all do need “work.” Its part of how we are fulfilled, something to do that gives us purpose. I love how our work changes through the different seasons of our life. I’ve waited tables, taught keyboarding/computer classes, worked at a cheese shop, for an attorney and doing interior design. Each had a place and time. And, the journey continues. But, like you, raising my kids has been the best!

    Liked by 1 person

  14. You’ve had an interesting journey, Marlene. So many people only do one thing, and not too well.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I think that’s why I love reading your stories, Lou. You’ve had such an eclectic work history yourself. Keeps life interesting. I’m the Jill of all trades and master of none but that’s how it goes. Thanks for stopping by.

      Like

  15. Those photos are just wonderful! All of them.
    That hairdo was quite the thing wasn’t it?
    Your story of the woman who asked you “what you do” reminds me of so many discussions about this. When we will as women support one another!?!
    Reading to and with my son was precious, just like I remember reading with my mother. A favorite memory is of the two of us going to the libraray every few weeks, coming home with stacks of books and reading out on the porch with glasses of iced tea ❤

    Liked by 1 person

    • Those were the big hair days and I’m so glad they are over. Never my style but in cosmetology school, I had to be the guinea pig sometimes. I’ve never understood why women didn’t support each other no matter which way they had to choose to go. Books weren’t part of my childhood but I made darn sure they were a huge part of my children’s. My house is insulated with books. Trying to find somewhere that can use them.
      Thanks for stopping by, Laurie

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  16. I just adore that hairstyle you had in high school. Would be super-trendy again now!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Oh, Jill! I hope it never comes back. We girls in Hairdressing school worked hours and hours to learn to do those and women would come into the shop later and say “my hair went that direction not this direction last week” I think I worked 6 months at something that took a year to learn. Oh well. A sign of the times. 🙂 Hope you are hanging in there.

      Liked by 1 person

  17. Congrats on your achievement, Marlene.
    I had a international career in network television and was a feminist and community leader. On being awarded a high honour for outstanding achievement in the industry, a younger woman interviewer asked me about my proudest achievement. I said it was raising two strong, decent individuals – my daughters. It threw her. Raising strong, decent children is one of the best life achievements a parent can have.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I’m in full agreement with you,, Cynthia. Raising honest, honorable and kind children is a huge endeavor. A strong daughter has been an extra bonus. The rest is just frosting. Well earned and sweet frosting though. 😉 Thanks for stopping by.

      Liked by 1 person

  18. Marlene, I loved reading about all your work experience during life! 😀 A strong work ethic is not a bad thing and like you I find it difficult to sit still unless reading … that is a treat I grant myself! What a fantastic variety of jobs and I had to smile how you were given the task of reading the small punch cards when your eyes were too bad for the switchboard job. Typical illogical decision! Ahh.. I am sure most of us will agree the best job ever is raising our children and see them become amazing, kind and happy adults! Mine is just starting out into adulthood (20 next week) and it is with overwhelming joy I see a young confident yet humble man, with so passions in his life and a drive for his future career. I loved my work baby-sitting when a teenager, later working for magazines, newspaper and over a decade in the timber industry which involved fantastic and fascinating trips in the UK and abroad! Life is never boring!

    Liked by 1 person

    • You have had quite the work history as well, Annika! Impressive. I wish my children were in their 20’s. 😉 One it 53 and the other 47. Makes me feel so old. I baby sat my entire youth for my siblings and others. It was the cooking for a man I didn’t really know that I found objectionable. I never minded feeding kids. Then and now, I’m barely a basic cook. You had some very interesting work that took you to interesting places. I’m sure your work ethic had and has a lot to do with it. Thanks for joining the conversation, Annika.

      Liked by 1 person

  19. your blog is very beautiful … Bravo dear 🌺🍂

    paintdigi.com

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  20. What a magnificent and fascinating post Marlene. I bet you could write a different post for each job you have done. Like you I was always encouraged to work. I began at the age of 12 as a babysitter and did that for the next 10 years. At 16 I got my CPR license and lifeguard certification and I was a lifeguard at the pool for five summers. I also waitressed at a country club! My rear got sore from the pinches I received. 😡 I almost want to say my favorite job was in college when I was a senior and my English professors allowed me to teach the freshman English classes! I did get my teaching certification but I went on to do many different jobs like medical editor and now I have come full circle and teach creative writing to adult students and I love every minute. 💖

    Liked by 1 person

    • Oh, I wish I could come to your class, Pam. I’ve always wanted to take a class but too many things impeded that so I’m doing my best on my own. All the other jobs educate us to be better people. Teaching anything to anyone is a great accomplishment. I don’t think I ever got pinched. 😉 I had a look! You know what I’m talking about. I started babysitting at 8! Crazy people thought that was a good idea but I always kept the kids safe and cared for without mishap. No training. Shaking head here. I think adults are more receptive to any education. We come to value it more. Sis said to tell you she can’t keep a steady hand yet to write. Tremors from meds are hard on her but will eventually be weaned down. I’m going to get some notes out this weeks. Long list of things wanting to be done. Have a great weekend and thanks for the visit. Hugs.

      Liked by 1 person

      • EIGHT? Babysitting at EIGHT? Oh myyyy. Laughing now, since obviously people realized even back then that you were/are an old soul.
        Oh yes, I know “the look” (or I used to, not so much now that I’m “over a certain age.)” Haha. Please tell your amazing sister that I don’t expect her to write – I’m just sending out good wishes for her continued improvement!! ❤

        Liked by 1 person

  21. Oh, Marlene! You have outdone yourself. I keep reading this post and looking at the photos. Hard work comes around full circle in your wonderful story. I can imagine the shock at the question when you were at the cocktail party. That was a terrible era for women, because suddenly every Mom felt she needed to do more, have a job that was fulfilling. It drained the life out of me, and millions of other Moms. “If you only stayed at home to raise your children you were a failure”… yet it was the hardest and most important job of all.

    I thought I was the only one who was never read to as a child (really, never) and then became a reader aloud to children. I know it was as wonderful for you as it was (and still is) for me. Bless your Dad for helping you with words. I know you always wanted to be a teacher. Can I make a suggestion? When Libraries open up, start a read-aloud children’s group. That’s what I did. The library will welcome this with open arms, and you know how much children love/need to be read aloud to. You will be the real teacher you always wanted to be.

    I love the photos! Oh, the bouffant hairdo is priceless!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you so much for those kind words, Jennie! My mother had her hands so full during my formative years, she could barely think much less read in English to me. My grandparents read German books to on the rare occasion I was able to visit them. I would love to read to children now but if you heard me, you would understand why I don’t. Bells Palsy left me unable to speak clearly as though I’d had a stroke. The kids handle phone conversations that are important for me to make sure they understand what I need. I think my teaching will have to be in other forms now. Like writing. I can make myself clear here. 😉 I agree, women were hard on each other back then. I think they still are. I’m glad the big hair days are over. 😉 That was a lot of work.

      Liked by 1 person

      • I completely understand your mother back in the day. Sitting down to read to your child when your hands are full? That would be a luxury. So, she spoke German and your dad spoke English? While that is complicated, children are resilient and adaptable. You are a classic example. Yes, the Bells Palsy would make it difficult to read to children. I understand. You’re right that your teaching can be writing. You have a gift for writing, Marlene. Even your comments draw me in like no others. Really!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Thank you, Jennie. That seems to be the Universe’s plan for me. My resistance is helpless against it. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • Yes, it does seem to be your destiny. Isn’t that wonderful?

        Liked by 1 person

  22. Weren’t you just a blonde bombshell with your beehive hairdo- were you cheeky too? What a super mixed career you had. Like you I was raised to help in the house, unlike you I tried “sloping off” as Mum called it to read. Being a Mum was my favourite job too, and like you I have had a mixed working life- retail in a department store, babysitter, waitress (3 days and I quit), department sore again, accounts dept in a newspaper, dispatcher in a biscuit factory, wages clerk in a mail order company(quit after a week- they were too busy to train me), pensions clerk( mind blowingly tedious but paid the mortgage), MUM, playgroup worker, preschool training manager, gift shop and historical site manager, shop worker in a knitting and fabric shop ( best job ever), hpusing support worker, housing support manager, sheltered housing manager and finally part time receptionist in a bacon factory, which was more fun than it sounds.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Oh Cathy, you made me laugh. Receptionist in a bacon factory. I can see how that could be fun. You did have such an eclectic work history. You reminded me of my 1 1/2 years in the fabric store. I LOVED it. There are so many little jobs I’ve forgotten about but being a mom was by far the highest calling.
      Just so you know, I never, ever thought of myself as pretty at any time in life. I worked too hard to even date. The first man I married had to work with me to see me outside of high school. I was too busy surviving to give much thought to anything but being clean and tidy. Life was a blur. I’m delighted we’ve had some similar work history. A little of this and a little of that. Keeps life interesting. Thanks for joining the conversation,

      Like

  23. First I’ve got to say that that photo of you and your mom in uniforms is the BEST. Your hair!!! Those classic uniforms. Your mom’s “cool” cigarette. The way you are both holding your bodies so similarly. Wonderful.
    Second I am sure you are a great mom. I’m glad you embrace that about yourself and are happy with yourself over it. An old Everybody Loves Raymond episode was on last night while I was washing dishes and his wife realizes she is happy being a mom and taking care of the family and that in that she is like her “detested” MIL, unlike her own very unmotherly mom. For me that was interesting because being a mom is my most important thing (to humans and cats)and I learned momming from other women, not too much from my own mother. I feel very valued by my family and the other moms of my kids friends and classmates, but “out there” in the world I was seen more by my job.
    Stay safe and thank you for sharing the personal story and photos! xo

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks so much for sharing here, Luanne. In the early years of my first marriage, my husband used to lob the “your just like your mother’ at me to make me cry. It took years to accept that we had a lot in common but we approached life differently. I learned momming on the job when caring for my siblings differently than my parents. I wanted to do that better than they did and followed my instincts. I think it boiled down to respecting them and making sure I was treated respectfully. It has to go both ways to develop caring humans. Being a mom to animals is the same. You can tell the character of a person in how they treat their animals. You are so obviously a good mom. It’s still the most important job we can have. You stay safe too. Hugs.

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  24. Hey Marlene, really inspirational post about the value of hard work, that’s what I’m about. One of my most memorable jobs was when I was 16. My friend and I would deliver Christmas trees in nyc. We diddnt drive so we had to push the trees in an old mail cart to different buildings in the city. To boot, we worked strictly on tips. We had the greatest time wandering around the city. Diddnt make much money but looking back we learned a lot about work.🤘🏼

    Liked by 1 person

    • Everything you do has value in the end. The experience itself brought you knowledge about your ability to persevere under those circumstances. It sounds like fun to be doing that with friends. I envy you that experience.. Thanks for joining the conversation.

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  25. Oh my gosh how freeking CUTE you are in that big hair and with that smile. Holy cow, what a doll. Also I love that pic of you on the chair reading to your girlie with you both under the blanket. So cozy and loving and warm. You live an incredible life. I am grateful that we were brought together. I just love the wide range of jobs your readers have listed here, and how so many people have worked a bunch of jobs. That is neat to discover. My favourite job…hm… I liked reading the weather updates on the NOAA weather radio before it went digital. I liked doing live weather radio during severe weather events, and keeping it professional and not making any mistakes while live broadcasting – that was challenging but exciting. Also, I said my name on air and got famous among surfers, haha! Another job I loved was nude modeling for art students while I was at Brandeis. I needed an on-campus job because I was stuck there in classes every day. Modeling paid the best on campus because apparently people don’t want to do it? I am lucky to not be that modest. For me it was a piece of cake. Hold still, get paid. Once the professor had me do a long pose while lying on the floor. I fell asleep. They just let me sleep for two hours, and painted me, then woke me up when class was over. So funny.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Oh my gosh, Crystal! Nude modeling is one for the books and falling asleep on the floor has to be very uncomfortable and chilly. It is interesting to see what kind of jobs people do in the world but jobs aren’t the only work. Your job of mothering Tara alone was a huge one you did successfully. The pay is never great for that work but the payoff is. Have a great weekend, Crystal.

      Liked by 1 person

      • I am most proud of raising Tara to be a person I am really proud to know. In the modeling class they always had heaters blowing on me. But yeah, I must have been tired to just fall asleep on the floor, in class like that.

        Liked by 1 person

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