Looking for answers to life's questions

This week resembled nothing that was written in my day planner. The entire country seems to be having one of those weeks. Someone said today they thought 2020 was over but this feels like a replay. I myself am feeling a lot fragmented and disjointed. This post may feel much the same.

No longer happy little tree

Here in my part of rain country, snow was minimal after the gigantic build up by the news. What was not minimal was the constant cracking of branches and trees loaded with ice coming to the ground! It was downright frightening when I heard all my butterfly bushes pull over the planter box they were in and hit the ground. We lost power at 3:00 a.m. and when the temp hit 58 inside, my daughter started packing to leave. She’s says she’s a delicate flower and cold hurts.

They covered my window nicely before

Will have to trim the butterfly bush way down and hope

We had to go into Portland to get a vacant hotel room till the power comes back on. Apparently, everyone else had the same idea. I whined like a 3-year-old once again at leaving my home. I did the same whine during the evacuation from the fire and smoke.

Trees here are covered in ice with many laying across the roads. We had no internet or phone service of any kind at my house so we couldn’t even start looking for a place until we got close to somewhere with power. Turns out the mall and all the restaurants were closed too so no lunch while we made calls. The only place that had a room for us was a downtown luxury hotel.  My daughter needed power to work so she made the call.

Icy tree leaning over my shed and neighbors house

It was a gorgeous hotel and had covered parking for the tiny fee of $10 a night for parking. That’s cheap in Portland. A little tricky to get there through the snow and icy roads but my beast with four-wheel drive went easily through. My fingerprints will remain in the door handles forever daughter drove with great skill. I brought a cold beer and had it with a Motrin after we got to our room.

Young pines stuck

 

We soon discovered this luxury hotel offered no in room refrigerator or microwave. It also offered no coffee, breakfast options, or nearby open restaurants. You do NOT camp out in a luxury hotel. We coped until the second morning when their power went out and we were on the 10th floor. I panicked. When my c-pap shuts down suddenly, I feel like I’m suffocating.

Widower all alone. I’m sure the park will get to this one soon.

My daughter and I were packed up by 1:00 a.m. when she finally located another room close to the airport that had everything we needed. It is perfect for isolated camping. I had hot coffee this morning and we heated up frozen breakfast bowls. No parking fees and much less expensive.

Cleanup beginning up the street

They are talking 10 days to get the power on. I’m hoping they are just tired of all the calls and want us all to leave them to do their work.

Once the sun came out 2 days later

We are fortunate to be able to pay for the motel, probably for the next year. Many are braving their cold, powerless homes. We have food from our home with us while the rest will probably not survive. We are coping well.

“If you can’t laugh when things go bad–laugh and put on a little carnival–then you’re either dead or wishing you were.”
Stephen King, Under the Dome

Have you found ways to handle the natural disasters in your life?

 

From my heart to yours,

Marlene Herself

Comments on: "Camping in a Hotel" (87)

  1. Marlene, I didn’t want to click Like, I just did it to acknowledge having read your post. What a bloody lousy thing to happen. Thank goodness you aren’t having to deal with this situation on your own. Wishing you fortitude xxx

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  2. Oh Marlene what a mess! I’m so very glad you are warm and safe and managing. Many years back we had a yard that looked just like your pictures. We lost so many trees and were actually trapped in the house for awhile. It was awful. I applaud your “look to better days” attitude. I’m not sure I’d have it in me to be positive at all.

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    • I was wondering if you got hit as hard as we did? If I didn’t stay positive, I would have broken a long time ago. You do know the drill. You are more of a keep on going no matter what person than you are giving yourself credit for here.

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      • We got snow for sure, but no ice thankfully. I manage because I have to, but there are days when I really would like to simply let others manage for me, although knowing my personality, I would still be in the mix somehow! Take care.

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  3. You both handled the situation in the best way, practical approach, possible.
    Hugs and best wishes that you can get back to your home soon ❤

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  4. I’m glad you’re both safe! No ice here just wicked cold. This is the first time I can remember that we’ve had mandated rolling blackouts because the energy grid can’t handle all of the demand. Fortunately we haven’t had anything near as drastic as you’re dealing with. I hope you’re able to get home soon.

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    • Thanks for the visit, Erin. I’m better with the cold than the extreme heat. My daughter is the other way around. I wouldn’t mind rolling blackouts as much as this. Everything still in the freezer and fridge will have to be tossed if it goes another day. Everyone all over the country has had some dealings with this weird weather. Hang in there. Spring is coming. I hope like a lamb. 🙂

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  5. OH my goodness Marlene, I am so very sorry that you are going through all of this right now. What a huge mess! I am happy you guys are ok but how scary and to have to go camping in a hotel….that is a lot of money. I hope you get to go home soon………be careful and take great care of yourself!

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    • Thanks so much for the visit, Wendi. My daughter is footing most of the bill since she has to work. So many older folks in our park don’t have this option so I’m very, very lucky. I think we just saw winter come and go in one day. The power is another story. It’s been hard to focus lately but I’ll get there soon again. No more freezing.

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  6. Oh my gosh Marlene. How scary! I hope you stay safe and warm and hope your homes rides the storm with no serious damage. Love & prayers to you and your daughter.

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    • Thanks so much, Cindy. The worst is over, now comes the hard work of repair. Once they get the thousands of miles of downed power lines repaired, we should be good until the next catastrophe. 🙂

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  7. I heard about your ice storm from my Salem friend. She had to explain to me how scary it was as I had never experienced an ice storm or had any knowledge of how devastating it could be up close and personal. So glad you’re both doing okay and hanging in there. You do manage to keep such an optimistic outlook and go with the flow which is really all you can do sometimes!

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    • I’ve been through far worse, Jan so this doesn’t rattle me the way it would others. It’s just life in the slow lane. I’m not as seriously affected as many so I’m grateful. I’ll be in touch soon.

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  8. Humor … whining … and a practical mindset will get you through the worst Marlene! Thanks for all the photos it really brings it home. My heart goes out to you … and all those frozen in ice! May you, others and nature thaw out and warm up soon 💕🙏💕

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  9. I had no idea that ice storms could threaten your way of live. It shows us vulnerable we all are on power, and so dependent. Solar cells don’t help much at that point in the middle of the night either. My fingerprints would be in the door too. Gosh.
    I hope it passes soon. My naive brain just thought you woudl stay indoors as we do in natural disasters but in this kind of extreme, it doesn’t help.
    Take care, Marlene.

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    • I think I’ve been through most natural disasters now. 🙂 This was a blip on the radar of disasters. My daughter is a very good driver but there were so many on the road that were not. I’ve never seen an ice storm do this kind of damage and I feel for those that have to deal with the loss of power in a cold home. The NE is a lot colder than the NW where I am so there is another thing to be grateful about. This did give me an eye opening about how much we depend on electricity. Love those wake up moments. 😉

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  10. Oh Marlene, I am so sorry. I’m thankful you and your daughter are safe and warm, but I know how much you love your home, trees and bushes. It’s hard to see the damage. I would have been gripping the car door too, and I probably would have needed two or three beers once at the hotel! Stay safe and keep us posted. If you need anything just holler. xo

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  11. Marlene, thank god that you made it out of the mess in one piece, and have been able to find shelter. Having intermittent asthma I totally appreciate that horrifying feeling of not being able to breathe. The house and plantings can be repaired It’s you and your daughter who are important.

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    • Thanks so much, Lou. I have terminal Pulmonary Fibrosis so breathing is quite an issue for me. Cold air doesn’t make my lungs happy either. I’ve managed to hang in there longer than anyone expected so this is just a blip in the road so to speak. I’ll be having a conversation with the park later when we get home about that leaning tree in the back yard. I may have footing now to have it taken down. Both my kids have asthma so I understand what you are dealing with. Once we get power, I’ll have to start the clean up. Hope you are weathering this winter better. We get a mild dose of it so it’s just fodder for a post. You guys get hammered.

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  12. Marlene, are you still at the hotels? As I’ve mentioned before, our daughter lives in Portland in the Pearl District. We’ve talked about the weather but she never mentioned it was this bad. We’ve lived through a couple of bad ice storms and it’s no fun being without power. Good luck in getting back to normal.

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    • We were in the Hilton by the Lloyd center for 2 nights and now at the Portland airport Comfort inn. I think Oregon City and south got most of the ice. The city of Portland fared a bit better. That’s why we found rooms here. We are only 25 minutes south. My daughter works on Pioneer Square when they get back to the office again. I’m still hoping they get the lines fixed by tomorrow. 😉 BTW, the sun was shining today and things are melting. No worries.

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  13. Good grief Marlene! What a mess. So glad you found your way to somewhere safe and warm. It’s a shame about your tree’s, they looked pretty mature. Luckily those things can be replaced. It seems like it snowed all over America just about! A friend in Louisiana got a rare snow storm and it wasn’t a skiff either. Then we saw Dallas got nailed too. Tonight, I saw Athens Greece got a good dump of snow as well. Wild, weird and wicked everywhere.

    We had an ice storm up here maybe 15 years ago now. I lived at the lake at the time and the power was out for 4 days. Luckily, I belonged to a gym and could shower b4 work. We picked up dinner on the way home. We even BBQ’d Pizza one day, ha! Our biggest fear was our basement flooding without the sump pump able to run. Luckily we had a generator to help, but you had to run it outside, like every 6 hours or so, so it kept things dry. I sure don’t miss living in the country!

    Hang in there!! xK

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    • My next door neighbor has had a generator running full time since Saturday. It’s hard to listen to the noise. I do wish I’d bought one but have no where to keep it. Hopefully, we will get back home soon. I’m not sure gyms are open here or if you can shower in one now with Covid.
      Yes, the whole country got hammered and you got your share of cold and snow from what I’ve seen. I’m counting my blessings here. The weather has been weird everywhere.

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  14. I understand completely about not wanting to leave your home. I’m the same way for the same reason. Plus, there is no way I would leave my animals. If they are going to be cold then so am I but at least we would be together. The weather has been just wicked everywhere! Here we broke all sorts of records for cold. Eleven alone last week! It’s still really cold but supposed to start a warming trend this week. I feel like I’m in a double prison now with the virus and the cold that will give you frostbite within a few minutes! I know about that feeling when the cpap machine suddenly goes out too. You can breathe but it feels like you can’t! So glad you have your daughter with you! Many hugs and love, my friend! ❤

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    • Thanks for stopping by, Jackie. I was thinking of you as I wrote this. I knew you had been hammered with snow and cold records. I don’t know how you are coping. I guess the fuzzy family keeps you going. I think mother nature has had it with us. I expect we will be seeing more and more of this kind of thing. Hug and love right back to you. You are always on my mind.

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  15. Oh my goodness, Marlene! That sounds like quite the adventure, but not in a good way. I hope there’s no significant damage at your home, and am glad to hear that you and your daughter are safe, sound and warm.

    We were hit with the snow and very frigid temps – 7 degrees – but no ice, thankfully. It’s beautiful how it encapsulates plants, but dangerous. The last two days we’ve had much warmer weather, and the snow is melting. Take care, my friend!

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    • I’ll take our weather to the 7 degrees, Missy. BRRR! We are warmer too and melting but power is still out so here we stay so my daughter can work. The house is fine…I think. Have to get someone on the roof to check later. Need a new one anyway. Will need to do some cleanup when we get home but nothing we can’t handle. It was magical seeing the trees covered in ice until they started breaking apart. Spring is coming. Hope you are staying warm too.

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  16. I do have an inkling of how you’re feeling. Last time a cyclone got too close a tree brought the local power line down. The whole city was out one way or another, there was flooding, and the power company prioritised the emergency services, hospitals and the elderly, as is only right. It took a week to get power back. Difference is, it was boiling hot too. If it had been cold, I wouldn’t have worried so much about the food in the fridge and freezer spoiling, In the heat, though, we didn’t need hot water so much, and the problem was staying cool, not warm. I don’t know if you remember, but we lived in the caravan, ran the generator in the shed way down the back yard to keep the noise down, and managed to run the fridge and caravan aircon alternately. Just as well, really, as all the local motels were full of emergency service and energy company people who’d come in from around the country to help fix the outages.

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    • I am so very grateful it happened in winter. When we lost power in Sept due to the fires, we were in this exact hotel for Air conditioning. We are really having our ups and downs this year. I can do the cold but I would melt into a puddle in the heat.
      I too, understand the linemen are doing the hard work and prioritizing the work. We have an awful lot of poor, infirmed elderly that rely on power for medical equipment. I have that issue as well. Those poor guys have to fix thousands of miles of downed lines so I’ll be quite content to sit it our here. We have people from other states here too. I’ve often thought a caravan would be good to have under these conditions. I’m glad you have yours. Great way to be prepared for anything.

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      • For us, the caravan is the security to hitch up and head for the hills in the event a cyclone heads straight for us. We can be safely up and over the range within an hour if we really shift… Fingers crossed the Big Chill ends soon and everyone will be safe and warm again.

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      • I’ll take an ice storm over a cyclone any day. I’ve been through them and they often don’t give you time to get out of the way. My husband had me opening windows as it got closer. I thought he was nuts but did as told. Several other houses on the block imploded because they were closed tight. We were solid and safe with the wind passing through. Who knew?

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      • Yup. Fences are built so they’re vented, louvres on shutters, all that. It’s always the trees with heavy foliage that come down, unless they were already wonky. But best of all, be somewhere else. Our Bureau of Meteorology is very good about publishing bulletins and projection, and I’m always glued to Windy.tv when there’s a TC in the offing, so we have enough time to bail.

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  17. oh wow, that ice storm looks terrifying but so great to hear you have been able to leave and be safe. Even if you are camping, at least you’ve camping in warmth and with resources.

    We haven’t had a major storm here in Auckland, New Zealand for quite a number of years but always when we do there are power outages. We had stormy weather Mon/Tues this week – but as the lockdown levels were changed (small community cluster outbreak of you know what!), many were hunkered down at home anyway…I was out today, medical stuff and the roads were quite empty and both times the cab went through shopping areas, all closed. Tomorrow Thursday most of Auckland region moved to next level back to semi-normality.

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    • This was a rare occurrence here as well. I’ve been here many years and don’t remember one. It has been better for us that we are able to get to resources here at the motel than for those still in their cold homes. Covid isolation is making everything harder but it’s almost over. We will start looking at things quite differently after this. Thanks so much for stopping by. One day I hope to visit your area. It looks so beautiful.

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  18. I hope you can come back home soon Marlene. Sending many good thoughts your way!

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  19. Yikes! Marelene, I’m so glad your daughter and you are both safe, warm even if ‘camped’ out in a motel. The ice looks frightening and I feel for you all during this time. I hope your home is alright and not too much damage to the garden. I laughed at the crossed out part of of the post … you got to the hotel in one piece and luckily you have a four wheel drive. Hope the power etc is connected soon for you. We lived one freezing cold winter without heating for three weeks, just had three portable ones (gas was off which powers the heating luckily had electric) but it was SO cold! Not fun! Take care, keep warm and safe. xx

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    • Thanks so much, Annika. We are warm and as comfortable as on can be at an airport motel. Planes going in and out all day. There are restaurants close enough and some are even open! I was just fine but we both need electricity for different reasons. She needs it to work so there were no options but to find somewhere else to be for now.. Day 5 in the motel and no sign of power in our area. With Covid being an additional factor in all of this, I feel for the many that have no other options but to stay in cold homes. Our winters are milder than most which is what I love about Portland, Oregon. My beast is old, 2005 but I bought it in snow country where we got feet, not inches of snow so I’m eternally grateful to still have it. I’m just NOT a good passenger. 😉 How is the weather treating you where you are? This whole country has been hammered this year.

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  20. Marlene!!! What a nightmare. My sisters are just like you, no power and ice that looks like it will never melt. It’s so sad to see the downed limbs and bushes. I am so sorry for you, Marlene! You will have a busy spring ahead. Will the town clear away what has fallen? Please keep us posted. Much love and good wishes headed your way.

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    • We are a privately owned mobile home park so they will see to the debris once we put it to the curb. I let them know I would take care of mine once we get power on again and can go home. Looks like a couple more days at least. We were lucky when I look at the rest of the nation. Things are melting and our motel is comfortable. Life keeps things interesting. 😉 Thanks for the visit, Jennie. I’m a bit frazzled these days.

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      • My sister who lives in WV has a generator, because years ago a terrible ice storm ripped through the area, much like this one. They lost power for over a week and came home to a mess, including tossing all the food from the fridge. She still can’t leave her home with the ice and downed limbs. She is like you, Marlene. She keeps saying that other people have it so much worse, and that she’s very lucky. Thank goodness you only have to drag the debris to the curb. Please keep us posted. Good thing you’re at the airport hotel!

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      • My son tried to talk me into a generator in Sept during the fires. If I had a husband that could run it. Way beyond what I want to deal with. I’ve been through so many natural disasters that this is just one more. At least we are warm and dry with plenty to eat. I have my embroidery, books, journals and laptop. Life is rolling along.

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      • You are a treasure, Marlene. If my husband were gone, there’s no way I would deal with something like a generator. Yes, this is a natural disaster, and at least you are warm and have food. And books, a laptop, and embroidery. Life does keep rolling on, Marlene. I wish everyone had your attitude and resiliency. 😍

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      • We are back home with power and as of this morning, internet. You don’t know how much you rely on this until you don’t have it. Quite the eye opener.

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      • Hooray!! I can imagine that having no internet is a shocker. Thanks for your good news!

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  21. Oh my!! When you alluded to the problems you were having in your neck of the woods, I had no idea it was so bad. I am so glad you finally found a place that had some of the necessities like coffee! And of course the ability to use your C pap.
    My parents lost power for about 10 daysabout 10 years ago and I will always remember driving to visit them and it looked like what I imagined a nuclear Winter would be. The trees frozen and fallen over; just white ice everywhere.
    This Winter’s ice has shown us that our current power infrastructure is not sufficient.
    Take care my friend. I am glad you are warm.

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    • Thanks for stopping by, Laurie. Our new management company is working hard to clean up years of neglect. All power lines should be buried if at all possible. Ours in the park are but of course, the rest are not. It’s still hard to look at all the damage here. I’m heading outside now to cut up bushes and branches while the rain pauses. Our weather is gentler here than where you are…most of the time. 😉 We are back home and have heat. 😉

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      • Marlene, what an ordeal this has been for you and so many others. I’m so sorry. I came back to reread this post, knowing I was tired the first time around. These photos are stunning. I’ve never seen ice like that and I had no idea it could bend and break and pull plants like the ones pictured. I hope you get some nice surprises this spring. Plants can be resilient. Sending a warm hug your way. xo

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      • Hi, Alys. It looks like a bomb went off here in the park. So many trees – gone! More going. They were talking $300,000 in damage here. I’ve been cleaning up debris for the last week and can fill at least one more can. The rest of the big stuff the park will remove including the big tree behind my shed. Spring has appeared this week. It’s lovely and warm. Life goes on. I’ve cut the bushes way back to give them a break and hope that restores them. Sis will be home Sunday. How is yours doing? Thinking of you every day. Sending love and hugs, M

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      • Marlene, what a stunning turn of events. It’s heartbreaking losing so many trees, all in one brutal series of storms. I’m glad the park will cover the cost of the tree removal (as they should). I hope it’s done soon so you can stop worrying about anything falling. I hope your bushes recover. Sometimes they skip a season and recover. Other times I’ve seen them come back like gangbusters. Time will tell.

        I’m so happy to hear that your sis is heading home. What a remarkable recovery she’s made, and in the knick of time.

        Things haven’t improved with my sister, sad to say. It’s been a long haul, with no happy end in site I’m afraid. Thank you for caring. xo

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  22. Oh, Marlene…I’m so sorry this has happened for you! Lucky you have a dependable vehicle AND daughter:) Terrible times, that’s for sure. I’m chilly here in TX with blankets and plastic at my windows and doors. My power has stayed on most the time, unlike so many others. Hoping you’re able to get back home soon!

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    • Thanks for stopping by, Becky. You guys in Texas and the whole southern region have really been hammered. We count ourselves lucky up here in Portland, OR area. Power was out for 5 days and some are still without but we are lucky. Internet is back again too. For now. 🙂 We came home yesterday and got internet this morning. Life here is good again.

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  23. Oh my gosh I was so scared for you as I read this post. I feel horrible about the trees and the bushes. I have a good friend whose family lives near the Portland area and her parents literally just died within three days of each other. The rest of the family is trying to get up there but it’s pretty tough with everything the area is going through.
    I like the idea of camping in a hotel. The only time I had to go through something almost as challenging as yours was when I lived in the San Francisco Bay area during the Loma Prieta earthquake. Power was down for quite some time as well as phones and my husband was traveling out of town and couldn’t reach me and couldn’t fly home. He was frantic! So now that I think about it it was probably harder for him than for me. Stay warm and stay safe! 💗xo

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    • I’ll take my ice storm thank you very much, You can keep your earthquake. Went through the Northridge CA quake in ’94. It was awful and not as strong as the one you had. You are right that it’s harder on people that can’t get to us.
      Camping in a motel is as rough as I’ll go. 😉 We stayed in an airport area motel and the planes were coming and going all day and night 2 days after our ice storm. I walked part of my neighborhood today. It looks awful. So much damage and spring is coming with it’s winds. It’s another thing to experience in life. I’ve been evacuated twice for fires, now for a power outage Going through typhoons and tornado’s plus several earthquakes reminds me how much I love being in my own home and bed. Don’t you just love those early morning wake up shakes?? ;( We are all warm and snuggled in our own place again as of yesterday. Today came the internet. 😉 And more rain. I’ll get a return note out soon. 🙂 Hugs

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      • I’m so glad you are back home. Home sweet home. We are so lucky to have that. Stay warm and stay dry! We have had ongoing snow here in Boston area since yesterday afternoon continuing tonight. I’m going to put on an extra blanket! 💓

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      • I hope you don’t have to go out until the roads are all clear. Sun shining for awhile today. 😉

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  24. Those ice storms do an awful lot of damage. I hope no one in your area was hurt as a result. Just out of curiosity, what was luxurious about the luxury hotel you stayed at? As others have said, you were so fortunate to have your daughter with you! Since I’m late reading your post, are you home safe and sound now?

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    • The Hilton had a lovely entry and at one time a bar and restaurant. Their fitness center was appointment only and I made us of it the first day. One person at a time with an hour between each person. The rooms were nice with a balcony so I kept our water and food we brought in a cold bag on the balcony. It had a view of a good part of downtown Portland. It was the only room we could find and many others were having the same issue. They just offered nothing to help people other than one expensive sandwich after 5 pm. Breakfast or lunch were basically not available and everything around us was closed. I imagine pre Covid, It was more fitting the price tag. We saved $45 a night and could get inexpensive meals around our airport motel. Coffee was hot and ready at 7 a.m. That’s all that mattered to me. 😉 Yes, we got home yesterday and we have internet today. I am grateful not more damage was done. I know of no one hurt here and all those I do know, have family and friends to help them through. Neighbors here tend to watch out for each other to some degree. I’m glad it’s over. On to the next adventure. Thanks for stopping by, Liz.

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  25. So sorry that you had to go through this! I hope the warmer weather comes soon!

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    • I think that was the entirety of our winter. Sun is shining and intermittent rain showers. We are so fortunate in the PNW. I wouldn’t want to live anywhere else. I’ve been outside lopping as much of the debris as possible for my green waste can. It’s full and I’ll fill it again after pick up. Most of my gardening days are over but can’t leave the mess. Thanks for stopping by, Claire.

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  26. A true horror show indeed! All those poor trees and bushes – makes me sad to see them like this. But of course it’s even worse for the people! My 8 hours without power and 3 days without hot water last month feel suddenly like nothing in comparison. We were so lucky everything got repaired so fast.
    I’m a bit perplexed that the first hotel dares to call itself a luxury hotel – no coffee equals no luxury to me!
    Glad you and your daughter found a way to keep warm! Hope your repairs will be quick!

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    • Adaptable and resilient are in play here as well. They need different trees here that do better in the wind and ice. I’m hoping that a lot of what has been neglected for so many years finally gets taken care of. It’s not luxury to me either with no coffee. They knew there was nothing available outside and didn’t step up to challenge. I’ve cut up most of the debris and will finish today. Take care and lots of hugs.

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  27. Wow, I hope your power comes on sooner than 10 days! We had people without power for 4 days here and thought that was crazy…

    My parents had a similar adventure to yours. They use CPAP’s too, so they went to a hotel when they lost power. Then their hotel lost power, so they went to our apartment. Then we lost power and were using batteries and inverters! We bought two deep cycle batteries that will be ready for the next time we lose power.

    Stay warm!

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    • Wow! Your poor parents having to move so often due to power outage must have been very hard on them. We managed to only be without power for 5 days and then went home. They are still working on the lines in more isolated areas. There were about 175 homes here that didn’t get power for a couple more days and internet took an extra day for us but longer for others. Those linemen are working so hard to get everyone taken care of and we are grateful. I could have managed without the Cpap but my daughter needed internet to work. That was our prime reason for the motel. I was glad the luxury motel lost power so we could go somewhere that we could afford to buy food. 😉 I’m not a luxury kind of girl but it was all that was available at that moment. Just going with the flow. Hope you are doing well and staying safe. Thanks for the visit, Bethany.

      Liked by 1 person

  28. Well, I’m late to read this, Marlene, but the upside is that now I know you are home again and you and your daughter are ok. Like you, I’ve weathered a few events and remember others well . . .

    I remember the big ice storm we had back east in 1998, mostly in Quebec, if memory serves me right. And I remember the blackout in your northeast back in 1965, too. And when the Loma Prieta ‘quake hit, my eldest son and his girlfriend were down there, but I was unaware that they had moved south from L.A, Nothing to do but wait to see if the news would be good or bad . . . It was a couple of weeks before I heard they were safe. Same happened when the 2004 tsunami hit Thailand and nearby countries. My younger son had been in Vietnam for a friend’s wedding and had planned a trip to Thailand, right where the tsunami hit. His girlfriend was on a course near the coast of India. And again, it was a couple of weeks before I heard they were both safe. The Thailand trip had fallen through at the last moment.

    And back in the winters of 1970-71 and 1971-72, we lived on one of the Gulf Islands. There are always huge windstorms in winter, mostly in November. I remember lying in bed awake, hearing the shallow-rooted arbutus trees (Madroña in the USA) coming down . . . we were in a very tiny summer cabin and did not drive, so no car; so no use trying to go anywhere; we just lay awake, listening. Nothing ever came near enought to hurt us, luckily, but some were fairly close. So I certainly can empathise with you!

    It’s stories like yours that make me so grateful for spending the first decade of my life without power, running water or indoor toilets. And as much of my adult life as I could manage, too. So I feel more prepared than most people for whatever comes my way. I used to always have emergency food supplies on hand, and as much else as was possible. Most of the tricks I know wouldn’t help you, though. For instance, when you have a wood-burning stove, you can heat rocks the size of bricks on the top, then wrap them in old rags and tuck them into your bed to warm it before you get in. I have copies of the SAS Survival Guide, too, and used to have a small survival kit (got the directions from the book) that was the size of a pack of smokes and could be carried in a pocket at all times. I also had a kit the size of a shoebox that stayed in the van (later on, when I could drive and had a vehicle) or truck. Always wanted one for the house, too, which is recommended, but you know, budgets . . .

    Times like these are among my reasons for disliking ‘open plan’ housing so much. I remember when we could close off most of the house and stay warm in the kitchen, but now you have to heat everything or nothing . . .

    I was able to buy some space blankets at our local dollar store (Dollarama; don’t know if you have them or not) and keep them, plus a small survival tent and sleeping bag cover, in the motorhome. I keep some emergency rations there, too, just in case. My plan is to slowly re-build my survival supplies. I expect this is only the beginning . . . Lucky for me, I’m in the house for the winter.

    Back to you, though . . . Finding the airport hotel was great! I can’t believe that a ‘luxury’ hotel would not step up and meet people’s basic needs, but I’m old-fashioned.

    I’m beyond glad that you are home again and I do sympathise over the cleanup that lies ahead of you. Not fun! I hope most of your food survived. As I read your post, I wondered if it would be useful to have a couple of quilted ‘boxes’ large enough to fit over the top of a frig and/or a freezer? They could be lined with space blankets, secured with duct tape or glue of some sort and slid over the equipment like a shoe box cover sliding onto the main part. I think that would help keep things cold for a bit longer, don’t you? They would need a vent, too, for where the exhaust from the motor comes out . . .

    Wish I was able to come help with the yard cleanup . . . I sure hope you don’t lose too many of your plants and trees. You are right, though; that one leaning over your shed and the neighbour’s house ought to come down before there is another storm . . .

    I have a god-daughter in Texas with her family. Still haven’t heard if they are ok or not. Sure was food for a lot of thought as we heard the news coming in over the past few days. To me, independence is a dangerous concept, but so is dependence. What I think works best is inter-dependence, where we all help where we can and accept help when we must. And where people are taught from a young age the required skills to stay alive in this world. One can dream, anyway . . .

    Hang in there, Marlene. You and your daughter, and everyone in the storm’s path, are on my list. Do take care and don’t try to do all the cleanup in one go . . . I hope things go more smoothly from here on in . . . and I hope maybe one or two of my thoughts here is helpful to someone. Warm hugs to you, my friend. ~ Linne

    Liked by 3 people

    • Thanks for visiting, Linne. I’ve been thinking of you a lot. I so agree that we need to be inter-dependent not independent or dependent. Helping each other is what it’s all about.
      I’ve learned over the years that what I need at a certain moment in time shows up. I have learned to trust and not worry…much. We had plenty with us that we could keep cold on the deck. I thought things might not thaw too fast as the house itself was cold and fortunately, the only things in there that we lost were probably needing to go anyway as they had been there too long. I had not done a big shopping as was eating for what we already had. A fresh start is not a bad thing. A fresh perspective is even better. We are doing things differently going forward. I think, all in all, this whole thing worked out well. My daughter had internet the whole time and was able to continue working. It was the main reason we left the house. I can survive quite well in the cold and do without food for quite some time. I am stocking up water again. Got lazy after the fires and didn’t replenish. Who has room to store up? Still need to send photos to the park of the tree behind my shed. A good wind will bring down more branches. I’ve filled the green waste can up once and will do it again once it’s empty. The big limbs can go up in the woods for creatures to live under. I was truly blessed in all this. I’ve been watching your weather too. Hope you are staying safe and warm. Think I’m finally done reeling from it all and ready to move forward now. Send an email and let me know how you are weathering the world. I don’t spend much time on FB anymore.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Linne, you mentioned the ice storm in Quebec – I’m pretty sure it was 1997. I was living in Vermont at the time, and the ice storm here in Oregon kept making me remember that one. It was a doozy! Power was out along some border communities for 3 months. I’ll never forget it.

      Liked by 1 person

  29. Marlene!! I had no idea you were suffering like this. Those scenes look terrible. Good gracious what a mess. I am so glad you two are both ok and I’m glad for your safety. I’m still sad about your beautiful garden though. I hope everyone in your neighborhood is ok. There are so many trees down. Wow. I wish I could help, or could have helped, somehow, but it sounds like you two had it under control. I know you are strong enough to weather a storm, I only wish there were fewer storms. Love you so much. ❤

    Liked by 2 people

    • I’ve been thinking about you since we got home, Crystal! Hope you fared better. Since we had no internet, we had to motel it so daughter could work. It’s a rough life but someone has to live it. 😉 Scrounging for food was the hardest part. 😉 The loss of the trees is the hardest part. My big one in the back yard needed to come down before someone, probably my neighbor gets hurt. It’s on the list. My butterfly bushes were already slated to be trimmed back but I didn’t do it soon enough. I think they will come back bigger than ever. If not, something else will have to go there. Everything has it’s time. I think all the neighbors were keeping an eye on each other so everyone seems fine. Our maintenance men will be busy for months. How are you and daughter doing? Send an email when you get time.

      Liked by 2 people

  30. Stephen King said it right!

    Liked by 1 person

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